Flip-Through Photobook with Adobe Spark Video

Students create their own photobook by remixing found photographs into a video

About This Strategy

In this 2-hour strategy, students create their own photobooks by remixing found images into a Adobe Spark Video. Students learn about how new meaning is attributed to found photographs through sequencing and they study the work of established photobook artists, concentrating on how transitions, grouping, rhythm, and tempo are used in published examples. 

Spark Video allows students to combine individual still images into a visually compelling slideshow, as well as add text, music, or narration to create a multimedia experience. This strategy may be adapted for use with other Adobe products, such as Adobe Premiere Rush.

Supporting Tools and Resources

  • Student sample
  • Adobe Spark Video
  • Adobe Premiere Rush
  • Editable Resource Bundle
  • PDF Resource Bundle

Outline for Teachers

Learn.

Students learn about how new meaning is attributed to found photographs through sequencing by watching two of these examples: Melissa Catanese’s Voyagers, Laura Larson’s Hidden Mother, Day Sleeper by Sam Contis, or False Lighthouse by Yael Eban.  They study the work of established photobook artists, concentrating on how transitions, grouping, rhythm, and tempo are used in published examples by watching one of these videos: Lee Friedlander’s The Little Screens or Robert Adams’ Prairie. (30 minutes)

Evaluate.

Students browse these archives of Public Domain found photos and select at least 20 to download for their own photobook: The Library of Congress, Found Polaroids, or The Metropolitan Museum of Art. (40 minutes)

Create.

Students create a video flip-through of their found photographs. They use these steps to guide them. Students can examine an example here, and read/watch  a tutorial here. (40 minutes)

Share. 

Students share their Adobe Spark Video as instructed. (10 minutes)

Steps for Students

In this strategy, you will create your own photobook by remixing found photographs into an Adobe Spark Video. You will learn about how book artists attach new meaning to found photographs through their sequencing and curatorial choices. And, you will study the work of established photobook artists, concentrating on how transitions, grouping, rhythm, and tempo are used in published examples. 

Spark Video allows you to easily combine individual still images into a visually compelling slideshow, as well as add text, music, or narration to create a truly multimedia experience that extends beyond the page of a traditional photobook.

Steps:

1. Learn about how artists attach new meaning to found photographs through sequencing by watching two of these examples: Melissa Catanese’s Voyagers, Laura Larson’s Hidden Mother, Day Sleeper by Sam Contis, or False Lighthouse by Yael Eban. (30 minutes)

Next, study the work of established photobook artists, concentrating on how transitions, grouping, rhythm, and tempo are used in published examples by watching one of these videos: Lee Friedlander’s The Little Screens or Robert Adams’ Prairie.

2. Browse these archives of Public Domain found photos: The Library of Congress, Found Polaroids, or The Metropolitan Museum of Art. (40 minutes)

  • Reflecting on what you learned in the videos, pay attention to how your chosen photos will work together to tell a story or create contrasts.
    • Successful photobooks often create a story, whether leading a viewer through a space or comparing a series of similar viewpoints or other images. 
    • Other photobook strategies include creating a rhythm as you introduce one picture after another. Look for similar or contrasting subjects, similar or contrasting compositions, colors, or other formal elements. You can create a rhythm by showing a series of pictures that are same-same-different, or same-different-same, etc.  
  • Download at least 20 photos for your own photobook.
  • They can be small JPEGS (side length of 200-400 pixels).

3. Create a video flip-through (slideshow) of your found photographs in Adobe Spark Video. (40 minutes)

  • Choose a theme for your project, which supports the story you are telling with your chosen images. Review the suggestions in Step 2 for creating rhythm or movement in your photobook.

    • Think about how Sam Contis identifies themes in her chosen photographs (sleeping people), how Yael Eban takes the reader/viewer on a voyage from ship to shore, or how Melissa Catanese identifies patterns in found photos of people reading. Review the video links above for more help.

  • Give your project an evocative title.

  • You may include an epigraph.

  • Choose music to accompany your slideshow.

For guidance using Adobe Spark Video, follow these steps.

4. Share your Adobe Spark Video as instructed. (10 minutes)

Rubric for Successful Analysis

Consult the attached rubric in order to evaluate students' videos.