Lateral Reading to Identify Online Bias with Adobe Spark Post

Students use lateral reading strategies to identify online bias
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About This Strategy

In this 1- to 2-hour strategy,  students learn the concept of reading laterally to identify bias online using a lesson from the Stanford History Education Group’s Civic Online Reasoning curriculum. Students will create Adobe Spark posters that teach others how to develop and improve their lateral reading skills. This strategy can be adapted for use with Adobe Illustrator.

Because Adobe Spark Post is an easy-to-use tool to create posters using images and text, students will be able to creatively communicate their learning about lateral reading.

Supporting Tools and Resources

  • Student Sample
  • Adobe Spark Post

  • Adobe Illustrator

  • Editable Resource Bundle

  • PDF Resource Bundle

Outline for Teachers

60-120 minutes

Learn.

Students engage in a whole group discussion to review who is behind online information using this lesson from the Stanford History Education Group’s Civic Online Reasoning curriculum . In pairs, students will go through a guided practice and then share out and discuss with the whole class to decide together what the criteria is for determining if online information is trustworthy. (60 minutes)

Evaluate.

Students make an outline of which steps are needed to find out who is behind the information and whether the information is trustworthy. Students review and analyze the rubric and examine an example (example 2)  as a whole class. (20 minutes)

Create.

Students create a Spark Poster that teaches others in your classroom or school how to read laterally. The posters highlight the evaluation steps needed to determine trustworthiness.  Students use these steps to guide them and can follow these steps for using Adobe Spark Post. (45 minutes)

Share.

Students share their posters.

Steps for Students

In this 1- to 2-hour strategy, you will  learn the concept of reading laterally to identify online bias using a lesson from the Stanford History Education Group’s Civic Online Reasoning curriculum. After, you will use Adobe Spark Post to create posters that teach others how to develop and improve their lateral reading skills.  

Adobe Spark Post is an easy-to-use tool you can use to create professional-looking presentations.

Steps:

1. Your teacher will lead a whole class discussion using a lesson from the Stanford History Education Group’s Civic Online Reasoning curriculum. Your teacher will show you an example Tweet to review and evaluate who is behind the online information. As you engage in this part of the lesson, consider: (60 minutes)

  1. What did you notice the teacher doing while they modeled? 
  2. Why was it important for the teacher  to look beyond Twitter itself to find out about the organization? 
  3. How did the teacher’s eventual evaluation of the tweet compare to your evaluation at the beginning of class? What was similar? What was different?
  4. Why is lateral reading necessary for finding out more about who is behind information? 

In pairs, you will go through a guided practice and then share out and discuss with the whole class to decide together what the criteria is for determining if online information is trustworthy.


Watch this video as a follow up to your in-class activity or if you finish early.

2. Make an outline of which steps are needed to find out who is behind the information. (20 minutes)

Prior to beginning, review the following: the rubricstudent sample 1, and student sample 2 to get an idea of what you can create.

3. Using Adobe Spark, create a Spark Poster that teaches others in your classroom or school how to read laterally. Include the key elements from your outline.  To do so, follow these steps. (30-45 minutes)

You can find  a great tutorial for making flyers in Spark here and  another tutorial on how to create Adobe Posts on a cell phone here.

4. Review your posters in small groups, give feedback, make adjustments for readability and design, and then  submit for teacher approval prior to hanging in the classroom or around the school. (10-20 minutes)

Rubric for Successful Analysis

Consult the attached rubric in order to evaluate students' posters.