Make a How-To Video with Adobe Premiere Rush or Spark Video

Students create a how-to video from scratch that demonstrates knowledge of a given subject area
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About This Strategy

In this 4- to 5-hour strategy, students will create a how-to video from scratch that demonstrates knowledge of a given subject area. Students will use video, voice over, and custom titles using Adobe Premiere Rush. The goals of this project are to share your methods and expertise on a given topic and to learn basic video recording and editing skills.

Premiere Rush enables students to quickly turn their ideas into videos that impress. You can adapt this strategy to your desired field of study, and this strategy can stand on its own or be paired with video/multimedia strategies to further investigate any desired topic.

Supporting Tools and Resources

  • Student sample
  • Adobe Premier Rush

  • Adobe Spark Video

  • Editable Resource Bundle

  • PDF Resource Bundle

Outline for Teachers

300 minutes

Define.

Students are guided by their instructor to identify topics that can serve as the basis of their videos that would make sense for their desired course/field of study. (60 minutes)

Prepare.

Once students have researched what how-to video they are going to make, students develop a script and a shot list and gather any supporting media to help collect their thoughts and provide a framework to create their final video. This could be done as homework. Consult the example script and shot list for ideas. (90 minutes)

Create.

Students create a 1- to 3-minute how-to video. Students can examine an example here, follow this guidance for using Premiere Rush, and watch a tutorial series on Premiere Rush here. (120 minutes)

Share.

Students share and publish their videos for the class to review per the instructor's directions. (30 minutes)

Steps for Students

Using Adobe Premiere Rush, you will create a 1- to 3-minute how-to video based on course content.  You will use video, voice over, and custom titles to share your methods and expertise on a given topic and to learn basic video recording and editing skills.

Premiere Rush enables you to quickly turn their ideas into videos that impress.

Steps:

1. Brainstorm and  identify a topic that can serve as the basis for your how-to video based on your class needs. (60 minutes)

  • It is recommended when coming up with a topic that you:
    • Think about how your idea might work as a how-to video. When thinking about this consider the following:
      • Does your idea have a small amount of simple, repeatable steps?
        • Are you able to film these steps, so they are easy to follow?

        • Can you show someone how to accomplish the task in 3 minutes or less?What works well about them?

      • Find some “how-to” videos do you think are well done

        • What would you improve about them?

        • How can you draw inspiration from these videos for your project?
  • Get creative! (Think big and outside the box.)
    • Jot down all of your ideas. (This gets the ideas out of your head and onto paper, and you never know if you will need them later.)

    • Share your potential ideas with other students to get feedback and ideas.

2. With your how-to topic identified, prepare to shoot your how-to video by developing a script and a shot list to help guide you through creating your video. (90 minutes)

Your script will serve as the guide for your entire video and should:

  • Introduce your topic.

  • Be broken up into small parts for the purpose of recording your voice-over.

  • Illustrate the steps you will be sharing in a way that is easy to understand for any viewer.

  • Include at least one fun fact so that even if the person watching doesn't follow the tutorial, they can walk away with some new information.

  • Take between 1 and 3 minutes to read. (Time yourself with a stopwatch.

Your shot list should:

  • Have a bulleted list of the video clips you would like to have.

  • Be in the order you would like to film them. (You can change the order when you edit.)

  • Use basic film terms like "close up, medium, and long shot" to describe where the camera needs to be when getting your shots.

  • Be available on the day of the video shoot, so you can check off your shots as you get them.

Here is an example script and example shot list for the sample video for your reference.

3. Create a 1- to 3-minute how-to video. Keep the following in mind when constructing your “how-to” video (120 minutes):

  • Have your script handy when shooting your video and make sure that you are hitting your main points as you are shooting.

  • Consult your shot list when filming; it was built to tell you what you need to capture for your video.

  • Consider what supplemental visual aids would be useful in developing your “how-to” video:

    • Are there diagrams, charts or other visuals that will help illustrate your points?

    • What on-screen text could help support your ideas?

  • You can use outside video and photos to supplement recorded footage. Websites like Unsplash and Pexels provide Creative Commons licensed images and video that you can use.

  • If you are recording a voice-over after the fact, be sure to record your voice-over in a relatively quiet space if at all possible.

  • You are able to record your voice-over multiple times and in small pieces, so take your time.

  • Remember: the content is the most important thing.

  • Go easy on yourself, and have fun!

You can examine a lot of these points in action by watching the example how-to video here, consider this guidance for Adobe Premiere Rush, and watch a tutorial series on Premiere Rush here.

4. Share and publish your video for the class to review per the instructor's directions. (30 minutes)

Rubric for a Successful Analysis

Consult the attached rubric in order to evaluate students' videos.