Tech Tools for Math: Making Learning Collaborative, Visible & Meaningful

Focus Area: Student-Centered Math
Audience:

Instructional Coaches, Leaders, Teachers

Pathway: Ownership

Available Now

Overview

As schools were forced to transition rapidly to distance learning, teachers were deluged with tech tools that would supposedly make their remote instruction simpler and more effective. This session is designed to help teachers step back to consider the kind of math thinking that they want to facilitate through the use of tools, how to decide if a particular tool is worth their time, and once they do identify a worthwhile tool, how to help students and families invest in the tech and eventually develop ownership. In addition to introducing teachers to a way of thinking about tech tools, it can also expose them to tools that can enhance student math learning both during emergency distance learning and when students are eventually back in the classroom full time. 

Audience

This learning experience is designed for classroom teachers who teach math. Instructional leaders, specialists, and support staff would also find the experience meaningful, especially if participating alongside colleagues. 

Specifications

  • 2 hours
  • Participants will need a computer with access to Zoom, a camera, a microphone, and stable Internet connectivity

Outcome

I use tech tools strategically to support students to collaborate, communicate and visualize mathematical ideas.

Learning Experience

Define

  • The potential of tech tools to support math learning by…
    • creating visuals & representations
    • eliciting & seeing student thinking
    • facilitating student collaboration
    • sharing feedback with students 
  • A process for planning around a tech tool with students by considering…
    • The purpose of the tool
    • How it works
    • What we would gain from using the tool in terms of supporting student learning
    • How much value it adds & if it is worth our investment
    • How to introduce the tool to students and families
    • How to build student ownership of the tool over time

Explore

  • A specific tool of choice, which could be 
    • A tool that is new to the individual 
    • A tool they have been meaning to learn more about
    • A tool you have been using and want to rethink how to get the most out of it

Build

  • A plan for introducing a specific tool to students and families and integrating it into their math class to enhance student learning experiences