Healthy Me!

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Objective

Students will be able to verbalize practices which keep a body healthy and share where they got their information.

Big Idea

Students explore healthy habits.

INTRODUCTION

20 minutes

Gather students on the rug using a preferred classroom management technique. I like to use my “Stop, look, listen.” The students stop what they are doing, look at me and listen for the direction. I usually preface the direction with, “When I say go…” This reminds the students to listen to the whole direction before moving to follow the directive.

In this case I would say, “When I say go I would like you to clear your space, push in your chair and go take a spot on your dot. Walking feet go.” By saying walking feet I am reminding the students to use walking feet in the classroom to ensure safe movement between areas.

The students then clear their space and walk to take a seat on their assigned spot on the rug.

I sit at the front of the rug area ready with the book needed for the lesson.

I feel a good book to use for this lesson is Oh the Things You Can Do that are Good for You: All About Staying Healthy, By Tish Rabe. 

I show the students the cover of the book and read the title of the book. “The title of this book is Oh the Things You Can Do that Are Healthy for You. If the book is called Oh the Things You Can Do that Are Healthy for You, what do you think this book is going to be about?”

I select two or three students to express their predictions to the class (I only select two or three students to share their prediction so the rest of the class does not get bored and cause a disruption). When a student expresses his/her prediction, for example, “Being healthy,” I extend the answer by asking, “What does being healthy mean?” If a student responds with “Stuff like riding your bike and eating fruit,” I may even go one step further by asking, “How is that being healthy?” This allows me to understand the students thinking and gives me an idea of how far I will need to take my lesson in order for the students to comprehend what a healthy habit is.  

Next, I tell the students the person who wrote this story is Tish Rabe. “If she wrote the words, what is she called?” Hopefully a student will raise his/her hand and say “An author.” If no students are able to answer the question I tell the students, “The person who writes the words in a book is called an author.”

I repeat this process by saying, “Aristides Ruiz drew the pictures. If she drew the pictures what is she called?” Hopefully a student will raise his/her hand and say, “The illustrator.” If no students are able to answer the questions I tell the students, “The person who draws the pictures in a book is called the illustrator.”

 Now I read the story to the students.

Whilst reading the book I like to check in with the students by asking them if they do the same things that the main characters do. I like to do this in one or two ways; (a) ask the students to raise their hands if they do the same thing as the main characters, or (b) ask the students to raise their hand if they do the same thing as the main characters and tell you about it when you select them. When I elect to choose to do (b) then I only select two or three students each time so I do not lose my audience through boredom.

At the end of the story I ask the students to tell me one healthy habit they have.

ACTIVITY

20 minutes

Before beginning the activity remember to have the supplies ready at the tables to cut down on loss of instruction time. You will need to have scissors, glue, pencils, crayons and the multimedia materials ready for the students to use.   

You will need a copy of the student book Healthy Habits booklet - one for each of the students. I also make a model book which I fill out to be a clear example for my visual learners. On one page I would cut out a picture which matches the healthy habit and on another page I would draw a picture of the healthy habit. The cut out page shows that you found the information in a magazine which was able to be cut-up for the project. The drawn picture reflects that you found the information in a book which is not allowed to be cut up. 

Once the book is over I tell the students they will be making their own “Healthy Habits” book. 

I show the students the little book I made ahead of time. First I show the students the page where I chose to draw the healthy habit written on the bottom of the page and then I direct their attention to the page where I used an old magazine cut out picture to illustrate the healthy habit.

I explain to the students that not all illustrators use drawings to illustrate the book. I tell the students that illustrators can also use photographs. I show the students the copy of the book Healthy Habits, by Rebecca Weber. “See how this illustrator chose to use photos to illustrate her book? This gives the reader a clear message about the topic of the book.” I hold up the exercise page next to the exercise page in Oh the Things You Can Do that are Good for You: All About Staying Healthy, and ask the students if the message is still the same.Exercise Comparison. I tell the students that illustrators can choose many different formats to get the authors message across to the reader. You could reinforce the message by displaying the sleep habit page.Sleep Comparison

I tell the students that they will be able to select how they illustrate their “Healthy Habits” book to get the message across to the reader. “You can go through the magazines and catalogs to find images of healthy habits to cut and glue into your book, or you can use the classroom books as a resource of healthy habits and draw to record what you find.”     

Before having the students go to the work area, I like to remind the students to take pride in their work by cutting, gluing and drawing carefully so other people can understand their work.

Now I send the students back to their seats a few at a time to maintain a safe environment in my classroom.

Allow the students about 15-20 minutes to complete the task.  

 

CLOSURE

10 minutes

When the time is up I blow two short blasts on my whistle and use the “Stop, look listen” technique mentioned above. “When I say go, I would like you to clean up your space remembering to take care of our things, push in your chair, bring your "Healthy Habits" book and use walking feet to take a spot on your dot.”

Once everyone is seated on their spot I tell the students that their “exit slip” to get their snack is to tell me one of the healthy habits they found and used in their “Healthy Habits” book.

"Room 203 students, your exit ticket for today is to find your favorite page in your 'Healthy Habits" book and tell me which healthy habit you are choosing and which image/illustration supports that healthy habit." 

I use the fair sticks to determine the order of the students. 

Student sample

Student sample 2

Student sample 3

Student sample 4

Student sample 5

Student sample 6

Student sample 7

 

ASSESSMENT

5 minutes

One method of assessment I use is to take pictures of the student work or keep a copy of the student book for their portfolio and for my record of the student’s ability to use a resource to gain information. I like to attach a checklist to the student’s work when I send it home so (a) the student’s family can see what was asked of the student and (b) the family understands the objectives of the lesson.   

I also have the students come over to me one at a time during either work station time or free choice center time to tell me three healthy habits and ask him/her what it means to be healthy.

I would also show the student two books on the same topic where the main difference were the illustrations. For example, a Gail Gibbons book about apples (she uses drawings to illustrate her informative books) and perhaps Jill Esbaum’s Apples (she uses photo’s in her book). I would ask, “What does an illustrator do and what do notice about these two books?” “Do the illustrations help the reader understand the text? How?”

Record the result for the student’s work portfolio.  

EXTENSIONS

Have the students complete the writing prompt, “I am being healthy when I…” I am being healthy when I...

 

Follow a rebus recipe to make a healthy snack (I explain to the students that they need to learn to read in order to perform certain tasks).

 

Act out healthy habits in a drama skills practice routine.

 

Count how many times students can run the width of the gym in five minutes. Graph the results.

 

Count how many sit-ups students can do in a minute. Graph the results.