Inequality Applications

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Objective

Students will be able to set up and solve inequalities for real world problems.

Big Idea

At most and at least - the most common mistakes in inequality verbiage - this lesson addresses their meaning, and thus their inequality.

Launch

10 minutes

OpenerAs students enter the room, they will immediately pick up and begin working on the opener – Instructional Strategy - Process for openers.  This method of working and going over the opener lends itself to allow students to construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, which is mathematical practice 3

Learning Target:  After completion of the opener, I will address the day’s learning targets to the students.  For today's lesson, the intended target is “I can set up and solve inequalities for real world problems.” Students will jot the learning target down in their agendas (our version of a student planner, there is a place to write the learning target for every day). 

Explore

45 minutes

Inequality Applications Notes:  Inequality Applications Explore Narrative This lesson is all about applications of inequalities (mathematical practice 2 and 4). Math is so much more meaningful for kids when they understand how it is used.  This lesson gives students the opportunity to practice setting up and solving inequalities. This concept is a bit harder for kids, so it is important that they persevere with problems (mathematical practice 1) and make sure their answers really make sense!

Summary

5 minutes

Instructional Strategy - Table DiscussionTo summarize this lesson, I am going to ask that students have a table discussion considering the question – If someone said to you that they did not understand why “at least” was greater than or equal to, how would you explain it?  I have chosen this as a summary question because there is most likely someone in class that has this question but is too afraid to ask.  I want the students to have discussions and be able to formulate a reason why.  During our class discussion, I will also flip and ask them about “at most.”