Percent Models Test

6 teachers like this lesson
Print Lesson

Objective

Students will be able to solve a variety of percent application problems using a percent bar model.

Big Idea

See the fruits of your labor! Do they get it? This short 8 question assessment will give you insight into your students' understanding.

Launch

10 minutes

OpenerAs students enter the room, they will immediately pick up and begin working on the opener – Instructional Strategy - Process for openers.  This method of working and going over the opener lends itself to allow students to construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, which is mathematical practice 3

Learning Target:  After completion of the opener, I will address the day’s learning targets to the students.  For today’s lesson, the intended target is, “I can solve a variety of percent problems using a percent bar model.” Students will jot the learning target down in their agendas (our version of a student planner, there is a place to write the learning target for every day). 

Thoughts from Me! As a way to dive into percents and create a conceptual understanding, students will utilize a bar model (mathematical practice 5).  They will use the model to represent scenarios conceptually (mathematical practice 4) instead of just punching numbers. Students will also reason abstractly and quantitatively by analyzing what each model represents (mathematical practice 2).  Students will look for repeated reasoning to make connections within percents (mathematical practice 8).

Explore

45 minutes

Summary

5 minutes

Instructional Strategy - Table DiscussionTo summarize this lesson, I will have students have a table discussion on: How are we going to solve harder problems like finding 18.75% of 53.  Up until now, I have used all examples where students could easily breakdown the numbers and use a model, moving forward, students are going to need to come up with mathematical operations that will allow them to do the same thing that as a model.  I am simply going to have students discuss this problem, I am not going to share right or wrong answers – I want them to leave my class thinking!