Adjectives

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Objective

SWBAT identify and use adjectives correctly in sentences.

Big Idea

Students will identify and use adjectives correctly in sentences while playing an Adjective Marathon game.

Narrative

1 minutes

Introduction

14 minutes

I begin by telling students that clouds are white and fluffy.  The descriptive words "white and fluffy" are called adjectives.  They describe clouds.  Adjectives are words that describe nouns or pronouns.  Other examples of adjectives are - hard, cold, red, soft, tall, short, shiny, etc.  (See attached Powerpoint resource.)  Different people have different perspectives and describe things in different ways.  Adjectives tell what kind, which one, how many, or how much.  I ask students to take a minute and list as many adjectives as they can think of in two minutes.  Afterwards, we share some as a whole group.  Next, we watch a short Brainpop video on adjectives and take the quiz afterwards.  (Teacher discusses quiz whole group and students show answers using sign language - a, b, c, d).  (Click here to watch video.)  I tell my students that in today's lesson on adjectives, they will participate in an Adjectives Marathon!  They are certainly curious about what this is...

Adjectives Marathon

30 minutes

Next, I explain to my students how to play the Adjectives Marathon game.  I explain to them that they will make a cross-curricular connection to physical education by jogging in place as they take turns saying an adjective and using it correctly in a sentence.  If students give wrong answers, they must sit down and are out of the game.  The last student standing or shall I say jogging is the winner and receives a small treat!  I encourage them to pay  close attention as we play the Adjectives Marathon game because to close the lesson, they will work independently to demonstrate that they understand what adjectives are and how to use them correctly.

Closure

15 minutes

To close the lesson, I ask students to do a quick write in which they compare two people, objects, or places.  They are to be sure to use and underline the adjectives in the sentences they write.  We share some examples whole group.  This is a CCSS aligned task in that it requires my scholars to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.  The task also provides them some choice because they get to decide if they will write about two people, two objects, or two places.  It allows them to draw upon their own prior knowledge and experiences as they develop a deeper conceptual understanding of adjectives.