Evidence for Evolution: #3 of 3

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Objective

Student teams will be able to communicate scientific information that common ancestry and biological evolution are supported by multiple lines of empirical evidence.

Big Idea

The Theory of Natural Selection presents claims supported by various lines of evidence.

Learner Goals

Note: I recommend that you first check out this resource in order to get the most out of this lesson!

In high school I took several drafting classes and, for a while, I had hoped to become an architect. With respect to planning instruction and teaching, I feel that I can still live out the detailed approach to building something intricate and complex even though the product is a lesson rather than a certain "built environment".

The lesson-planning document that I uploaded to this section is a comprehensive overview of how I approach lesson planning. This template includes the "Big Three" aspects of the NGSS standards: Disciplinary Core Ideas, Crosscutting Concepts, and Science Practices. Of course, there are many other worthy learning goals, skills, instructional strategies, and assessments that can be integrated into a class session. I don't feel compelled to check every box but, rather, use it as a guide to consider various options and tailor the lesson in light of these.

With regard to this particular lesson...

1. Students will be able to communicate scientific information that common ancestry and biological evolution are supported by multiple lines of empirical evidence. (HS-LS4-1)

2. Students will understand that genetic information provides evidence of evolution. Such information is also derivable from the similarities and differences in amino acid sequences and from anatomical and embryological evidence. (HS-LS4-1)

3. Students will be able to cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or descriptions (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.9-10.1)

I hope you get some value from my work!

Anticipatory Set ("Hook")

Please cick here to return to Day #2...

Teaching Challenge: How do I develop routines and procedures to support students to work independently in the science classroom?

SMART Goal Tracker: Due to the tight time limits for presentations today, students will be required to establish at least one SMART Goal (on Success Tracker) for today’s work (as homework last night).

Today's focus shifts from researching and composing arguments, evaluating evidence, and explaining the reasoning behind the Theory of Natural Selection to communicating information in clear and concise language. Furthermore, students will be active listeners as they glean information related to the various lines of evidence that they did not pursue. Herein lies the crux of the jigsaw method.

Instructional Input/Student Activities

55 minutes
Teaching Challenge: How do I develop routines and procedures to support students to work independently in the science classroom?
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/FEMA_-_39463_-_Microphones_at_the_podium.jpg
Evolution Evidence Jigsaw Project/Team Presentations
1) Using this Presentation Feedback Form, students will, in turn, a) present to the class or b) participate as an actively listening audience member. Here is a list of attributes that I prep my students to remember before the show gets rolling.
Presenter "Look-fors":
1. Good body posture; no leaning on furniture
2. Eyes on target (look over multiple parts of the classroom)
3. No side-talking (e.g. deciding who is going next or rehearsing what will be said)
4. Proactively anticipate your turn to contribute
5. Clearly enunciate
6. Project your voice so that the whole room can hear you speak
7. Smile!
Audience "Look-fors":
1. Good body posture
2. Eyes on target
3. No side-talking
4. Taking meaningful notes
Clearly, with eight teams presenting and, in my case, only 55 minutes with which to work, there needs to be tight controls not only on the time allotted for each team (no more than 4-5 minutes for a total of 40 minutes). With time for one or two questions and/or comments and transition time between each team, time management skills on behalf of the instructor is crucial.

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Closure: What did we learn? Where do we go from here?

SMART Goal Tracker (to be done at home later this evening): Direct students to self-evaluate their progress relative to the SMART Goals articulated at the top of class. Remind them to keep these up-to-date each class session. Require them to determine (to the best of their ability) how much progress was made toward the goal (0-100%). I spot check these to instill a sense of urgency and importance.