You Can Make a Difference In the Life of An Endangered Elephant

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Objective

Create a poster and a PSA explaining the importance of saving the African and Asian Elephants.

Big Idea

Cause and effect relationships are identified and used to explain that when the environment changes some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die.

Introduction

1 minutes

Warm up

5 minutes

During this unit, we have been studying about elephants and the fact they are an endangered species. I showed a video from Save the Elephants. org that relates the plight of the elephants in a way that third graders can relate to. 

Guided practice

15 minutes

After watching the movie, we had a discussion, using the think, pair, share strategy,  about what kids could do to share the idea that elephants need to be saved. We read an article from National Geographic Kids, "Angels" Help Elephants, which helped them realize that even kids can make a difference! 

Explore

30 minutes

Students created posters that shed light on the plight of these magnificent creatures. Here are some sample of these posters, Save The African Elephant Poster, Save The Asian Elephants Poster. Some students created question and answer cards like this one,Question and Answer Card Sample CoverQuestion and Answer Card Sample Answer, and same created public service announcements that we played in the hallway so that students could stop and learn about the elephants. They came to understand why elephants are endangered. Here are some samples,  Why Save The African Elephant?  Why Save The Asian Elephant?

Class Discussion/Wrap Up

10 minutes

This lesson brought my students to the realization that one person can make a difference. They were able to explain the cause and effect relationship between the elephants plight and the impact that humans have on the elephant's environment and survival. Many students even asked their parents to sign the petition that is found  on the Kids National Geographic site to Ban Ivory