Acids vs Bases

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Objective

SWBAT compare and contrast acids and bases.

Big Idea

What is an acid? What is a base? Students investigate and learn that not all acids are harmful and some may even be important in our bodies.

Engage

10 minutes

Engage

In this lesson, I want to "switch it up" so, I ask students to pick a (Acid Base) Notecard and find a partner (ie- an acid notecard matches with a base notecard). Next, students move and sit with their new partner. This "switching" provides a fun, interactive opportunity for students to talk with a new peer for the lesson and also activates their knowledge of acids and bases.

To add technology to the learning, I ask students to log on to Google Classroom. I send each student a link with a question through Google Forms "What do you know about acids and bases?" Students submit their answers on the Google Form and as a class watch the screen for a live display of student responses. I project the responses directly from Google Live Responses. These formative responses are live, authentic, and meaningful: Student Responses 1 and Student Responses 2.

Optional: You can do this formative assessment with paper and pencil. Give each student a pre-printed copy of the question and allow them a few minutes to write their response. Anonymous responses could be read aloud as students complete them.

Explore

5 minutes

Explore

I present students with a reading task and ask them to learn about acids and bases. My students use the textbook as a resource which contains basic information about acids, bases, and the pH scale. As an option, you could use tradebooks or other non fiction text or articles to introduce students to the concepts*.

I ask "What is the difference between acids and bases?" and ask student to read, learn, and explore. Students take time to discuss with their partner(s) similarities and differences between acids and bases. As students read, they (RST.6-8.4) determine the meaning of symbols, key terms and other domain-specific words and phrases such as: acid, base, neutral, pH scale, litmus paper, and pH paper.

I want students to investigate further, broaden their knowledge of the concept, and develop background knowledge about acids and bases. Reading will help students to uncover any misconceptions they have, challenge their thinking, and allow them to ask questions (SP#1) about acids and bases. As students read with their peers, I circulate the classroom to listen and respond to their needs and questions.

Optional: You can use any text as a resource for students to learn about acids and bases. Many times you can find and share a variety of tradebooks with these science concepts. Look in your school library, community library, and/or online for short non fiction text.

*Some choices might be:

Chem4Kids Acids and Bases Are Everywhere

Science Buddies Acids, Bases & the pH scale

Explain

20 minutes

Explain

I ask students to (RST.6-8.9) compare and contrast information about acids and bases so that as they investigate in the next lessons in this unit (Matter & Atoms), they will have a better understanding the concept. Students will strengthen their Science Process Skills sort and classify, as they compare and contrast information about acids and bases. Science Process skills are useful in science and other situations and require critical thinking.

Through Google Classroom, I share a Venn Diagram template from Google Draw. My students use Chromebooks and this tool allows them to download the Venn Diagram template, add their own information and appropriate images, and to personalize their product. Students save their work and send it back to me through Google Classroom. To be clear about end product expectations, I list the key components on the board. Students must include: 2 facts about acids, 2 facts about bases, 2 facts about how acids/bases are the same, and 4 images that are acids and/or bases.

Several Student Examples are included as resources to understand expectations of the finished product.

Optional: You could have each student complete a paper/pencil Venn Diagram, have them work with a partner to complete one Venn Diagram, or have small groups create a Venn Diagram on a poster to share with the class.

Evaluate

5 minutes

Evaluate

An essential piece of the 5E's model is evaluate. I ask students to refine and improve their Venn Diagram using the assessment criteria from the Rubric. The Venn Diagram is one formative assessment component from the lesson. As students are working on their final product, I circulate the classroom and ask clarifying questions. During this valuable time, students communicate their level of confidence and understanding of the concepts.