Using Family History to Improve Your Health

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Objective

SWBAT explain the how the risks of common (and in some cases preventable) diseases have both a hereditary and environmental component.

Big Idea

Students explore how the risk for developing certain diseases has both a hereditary and environmental component through various activities.

Engage

10 minutes

In this section of lesson I engage students by showing students the video below. 

The video is used to spark a discussion with students about what it means to be at risk, health family history and why it is important. The movie also acts as a teaser to excite student interest before doing the Risk Continuum (Explore section) and Pick The Risk activities.

Questions addressed in Discussion:

1)  What does it mean to be "at risk" for developing a disease?

2)  Do you believe it is important to make healthy choices and take good card of your body?

3)  Are you aware of the health history of your family?

4)  Why is it important to know your family health history?

Teacher Notes:  As both a science and health teacher this lesson allows me to address both since this is prevalent issue is a cross between health and science.  In addition, the students in video resemble the student population at my school (EL learners) which makes content relevant to their daily lives. The rise of diabetes in the Hispanic community is alarming and I hope through lessons like this students across the nation will understand what it means to be at risk and make wise decisions about their personal health choices. 

Explore

15 minutes

in this section of lesson students explore the concept of being at risk by completing a Risk Activity. (Genetic Science Learning Center)

Description

A whole-class kinesthetic demonstration of what it means to be in a "risk group" for developing heart disease based on family history/genetics.

Learning Objectives

  1. People can be assigned to a risk group for developing heart, and other diseases based on family history/genetics.
  2. Lifestyle choices can positively or negatively influence the risk of developing heart disease.
  3. A higher risk means a greater chance of developing heart disease, not an inevitability of developing it.
  4. Though a lower risk means there is a reduced chance, it is still possible for members of this risk group to develop heart disease.

Materials

  • Per Group of 30:  10 copies of Life Stye Choice Cards (Risk Activity), cut to form individual cards, (30 total).  Shuffle them and place them in a bag or other container.

Discussion Topics

  1. People in all risk groups develop heart disease with the largest percentage being from the "high" risk group.
  2. Not all people in the high risk group develop heart disease.
  3. Making positive or neutral lifestyle choices can influence your risk enough to prevent developing heart disease. (Ask students for which this was true to raise their hands.)
  4. Sometimes, people who make positive or neutral lifestyle choices still develop heart disease. (Ask students for which this was true to raise their hands.)
  5. Some people who make negative lifestyle choices do not develop heart disease, even though their risk is increased.

Extend

30 minutes

In this section of lesson students extend their learning by completing a Health Family Web Quest. (Genetic Science Learning Center)

Description

Students explore the Using Family History to Improve Your Health module on the Genetic Science Learning Center website to complete a web quest. 

Learning Objectives

  • Chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes, run in families.
  • An individual's environment, personal choices and genetic make-up all contribute to their risk of developing a chronic disease. (CCC - Cause and Effect, MS-LS3-2 - sexual reproduction results in offspring with genetic variation)
  • Family heath histories can provide important information about an individual's risk of developing a chronic disease.
  • Lifestyle modifications that improve health can reduce individual's risk of developing a chronic disease.

Activity Instructions

Evaluate

5 minutes

In this section of lesson students complete an Exit Slip.  The exit slip is a variation of Fact First Questioning.

Fact First Questioning:

This strategy is a higher-order questioning technique used to draw out student knowledge beyond recall level.  It take a factual "what" question (in this case statement) and turns it into a deeper "how" or "why" question because your are stating the fact first and asking students to elaborate with evidence. (SP2 - Engaging in Argument from Evidence/WHST.7.1 - Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.)