Karyotyping: A Look at A Cell's Chromosomes

7 teachers like this lesson
Print Lesson

Objective

1. Multicellular organisms have a hierarchical structural organization, in which any one system is made up of numerous parts and is itself a component of the next level. (HS-LS1-1) 2. Enduring Understanding #1 (Most of the cells in a human contain 46 chromosomes: 2 x 22 autosomes and 1 x 2 sex chromosomes = 46 total).

Big Idea

The chromosomes of an organism's cells, in part, define certain aspects of its nature.

Learner Goals

Note: I recommend that you first check out this resource in order to get the most out of this lesson!

In high school I took several drafting classes and, for a while, I had hoped to become an architect. With respect to planning instruction and teaching, I feel that I can still live out the detailed approach to building something intricate and complex even though the product is a lesson rather than a certain "built environment".

The lesson-planning document that I uploaded to this section is a comprehensive overview of how I approach lesson planning. This template includes the "Big Three" aspects of the NGSS standards: Disciplinary Core Ideas, Crosscutting Concepts, and Science Practices. Of course, there are many other worthy learning goals, skills, instructional strategies, and assessments that can be integrated into a class session. I don't feel compelled to check every box but, rather, use it as a guide to consider various options and tailor the lesson in light of these.

With regard to this particular lesson...

1. Students will understand that multicellular organisms have a hierarchical structural organization, in which any one system is made up of numerous parts and is itself a component of the next level. (HS-LS1-1)

2. Students will understand that most of the cells in a human contain 46 chromosomes: 2 x 22 autosomes and 1 x 2 sex chromosomes = 46 total.

I hope you get some value from my work! Please find the more intricate details of this lesson plan there.

Anticipatory Set ("Hook")

10 minutes

Teaching Challenge: How can I develop a classroom culture that encourages student engagement, curiosity, and a desire to understand the world through scientific exploration? 

KWL: “Traits are passed from parents to offspring.”

Know (5): “Describe what you know about physical traits organisms have and how they are passed from their parents.”

Want to know (5): “Pose different questions about what traits are, how they show up in organisms, and how they are passed from parent to offspring.”

Refer to how I use the KWL strategy at this link.

By leveraging what students already know (background knowledge and experiences), a neural commitment is established and momentum generated toward wondering about the very personal experience of shared traits among family members and the inevitable questions (from the simple to the complex) that accompany learning about genetics!

Instructional Input/Student Activities

30 minutes

Teaching Challenge: How can I increase/improve my students' use of appropriate and precise scientific vocabulary?

Word Wall: When I use this strategy, I pre-determine the key terms that the lesson in question hinges upon. What I frequently ask my students to do is to make sense of the biological world. To do so, students will need to be familiar with these terms: chromosome, autosome, karyotype, diploid, haploid, somatic cell, sex cell

Teaching Challenge: How do I support students to develop and use scientific models?

Karyotype Activity: Students will complete the Karyotype Diagram worksheet with attention to the kinds of chromosomes (autosomes v. sex chromosomes), the differences in chromosomes (length, banding patterns/striping, and position of centromere). The chromosome is the basic model for heritable genetic information and an understanding of genetics cannot be properly grasped without knowing the nature of the chromosome.

Closure: What did we learn? Where do we go from here?

15 minutes

1. Using Karyotypes To Diagnose Genetic Disorders: Students will read the featured karyotype article to expand their understanding of chromosomes and karyotypes.

2. KWL: Learned-List five things that you learned about a cell’s chromosomes (that influence an individual’s traits).