Light it up!!

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Objective

SWBAT identify different light sources.

Big Idea

Come and learn all about light sources with a game that will knock your socks off!!

Setting the Stage:

Next Generation Science Standards Connection:

This beginning lesson will allow students to explore sources of light. It is a building block for providing the necessary prior knowledge that will help them with the deep learning that will occur throughout this unit.

Students will investigation different light sources by playing a concentration game. The investigation will allow my students to gather evidence on a variety of light sources in their environment.  Students will record their observations and evidence in their scientific journals.

Classroom Structures:

In order to support a high level of student discourse within my science lessons I have assigned two different student partnerships.  Turn and Talk Partners are discourse partners that work together to share the deep thinking that happens throughout the day.  Workshop Partners are partners who are matched together for the purpose of working during our independent times.  In this lesson students will be engaged in both partnerships.

Home-School Connection:

I LOVE involving parents in the learning in my classroom.  This parent letter is both an introduction to our next two units as well as a request for supplies. Many of the items used to teach this unit are recyclable items so I ask for help from parents and colleagues.

 

Materials:

1. Parent Letter

2. science vocabulary

3.  Slinky

4. Light Sources Recording Sheet

5. Concentration: Light Sources

6. Science Journal - (Avery Labels 5163) I use blank paper in my journals so my students have more space and freedom to experiment with graphic organizers, illustrations, etc.

7. What makes things illuminate? (Avery Labels 8160)

Engage:

5 minutes

I have all my students gathered in our meeting area on the rug.  I want to activate student prior knowledge by reminding the students what they learned in our previous lesson about light "Lesson Are You Afraid of the Dark?"  We review the words dark, light, flashlight, night light and lamp. 

In our last lesson you learned that objects need light to be seen.  Without light we wouldn't be able to see things.

Let's pretend we are going on a bear hunt and it could dark. What sorts of things should we pack? My students say things like flashlights, binoculars, etc.  We play the song The Cool Bear Hunt by Dr. Jean. What did you use when you got to the cave? You are right!  You pulled out a flashlight. Why? I listen to my student responses. 

Today you are going to learn all about light.  Did you know that light is also formed by waves?  This is an example of how light waves work.  I model the movement of light waves using a slinky.

As the light waves move about it allows things to illuminate.  Can you all say illuminate?  Illuminate is a fancy word for "light up."  When the flashlight is turned on in a cave, the cave lights up. When I open the blinds the sun shines into our classroom and our room illuminates.  When I turn on the light in our classroom our room illuminates. Can you share an example with your Turn and Talk Partner? As they share their ideas I listen in to the conversations to ensure they are understanding the term illumination.

You got it!  I heard Nate say, "When I turn on the light my bedroom illuminates." Light is all around us and we could not live without it. It keeps us warm and lets us see the world. 

So boys and girls today we are going to answer this question "What makes things illuminate?" 

Explore:

15 minutes

When writing this lesson I really wanted to give my students a chance to discover light sources in their environment. I give each child a clip board and a recording sheet and ask them to research by observing different light sources. I ask them to record their findings on their recording sheet. My students find light sources like light bulbs, the sun, flashlights and a projector light.  I stage some other light sources in the school like nightlights, lamp, and a string of lights.  As my students wander the school they work with a partner to find, record and discuss light sources. I want to hear my students using vocabulary like: illuminate and light source.

Boys and girls, we know that scientists always ask questions and then they investigate those questions. You will investigate this question: What makes things illuminate?  You and your workshop partner will discover different light sources that make things illuminate.  A light source is the place that light comes from.  I show my students the words, illuminate and light source and add them to our science vocabulary bulletin board.

Today you are about to do the work of a scientist. You will use your science journal and  you will walk through the school and playground looking for light sources.  You will be working to answer our question, What makes things illuminate? In this school and outside of our school you will do research to find the answer to our question. Once you find 4-6 things we will head back to the classroom to share that research. Please be sure to draw detailed illustrations using labels and captions.  I show my students examples of good labels and captions.

As my students are working, I will walk around and listen for students to use our new vocabulary: light source and illuminate.  I will also use this time to walk around and confer with each student naming and noticing the smart thinking happening. Conferring is the process of listening and recording the work the student or students are doing and then compliment the work. As I listen, I research a teaching point and then work to provide clarification through questioning, modeling and re-teaching.  I record my observations on science recording sheet and use this data to drive my teaching.

Explain:

5 minutes

I ask my students to meet me in the meeting area to report their findings to the class.

Boys and girls you were asked to learn about different light sources.  I would like you and your partner to report out your findings.  You please sit here in our chairs labeled scientists. It is your turn to do something else that scientists do.  Scientists have to report their findings to other scientists all the time. When you sit in these chairs you have to look at your audience, speak loud enough for everyone to hear you and sit up straight.  Who is ready to be our first group of scientists to report out today? I want you to try and answer this question: How does light affect the ability to see objects?

As the children are reporting I am recording any new learning on our anchor chart title, "Illumination and Light Sources." I also use their reports as a formative assessment that will drive the instruction in our next lesson. 

Elaborate:

20 minutes

The purpose of this game is to provide students time to think about illumination and the light sources around them.  This will activate prior knowledge and prepare them for the thinking and wondering that will happen throughout the lesson. While playing the game I will walk around and confer with my young students. I will be recording my observations on my clip board. 

This game is called Concentration. The goal of this game to find the pictures that go together. For example if you see a picture of the sun, its partner will be something that is illuminated by the sun.  What do you think could be in the other picture?  My students call out answers like a mountain, a hiking trail, or the playground. I model explicitly how to play the game.

WOW! Great ideas!!   Each picture will say, "What illuminates the .."  Let's see if we can learn all about illumination and light sources.

As my students are working I walk around and confer with each student naming and noticing the smart thinking happening. Conferring is the process of listening and recording the work the student or students are doing and then compliment the work. As I listen, I research a teaching point and then work to provide clarification through questioning, modeling and re-teaching.  I record my observations on science recording sheet and use this data to drive my teaching.

Evaluation

5 minutes

Writing in first grade can be in the form of illustrations, labels, and words.  I have my students write in a journal during and/or after every science lesson.

In order to check for understanding, I send my students back to their science journals and ask them to take a few minutes write about light sources and illumination. In their journals, I ask them to write the answer to our big question.  What makes things illuminate? I will be looking for answers like, "I learned that light sources are the sun, a lamp, car lights, a candle. When lights go on it make things illuminate or light up."