More Practice With Key Ideas & Details

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Objective

SWBAT determine the main idea of a text by focusing in on the main details in a text.

Big Idea

How can I determine the main idea of a text without getting wrapped up in too many details?

Introduction

10 minutes

To get started, we review what we've been discussing over the previous four lessons. I ask students to recount some of the details of the story and we briefly discuss the problem in the story. I draw students’ attention to the problem in the story and the two ideas that each of the main characters were trying to get across to each other. We review our anchor chart as well as our graphic organizers and note taking sheets we've been using through out the unit. I point out to students that this is what good readers do to review what they have read and check their understanding of what they've read. Next, we move into students responding to the story on their own.

Independent Practice

25 minutes

To determine whether or not students have been able to recount this story and determine the details that support the central idea, I created some questions for students to answer. The questions are centered on the story we've been reading in the previous lessons, A Fine, Fine School by Sharon Creech. Some of the questions focus on details in the story, while others focus on the central idea of the story and what each of the main characters were trying to show. Some of the questions ask students to show evidence from the story while others require them to think about specific areas of the story and how it supports to the overall idea in the story. Students are given these questions and asked to respond to them independently. Students are encouraged to use their notes and graphic organizers from previous lessons.

Wrap Up

10 minutes

After students are finished with the questions, we come back together as a whole group and go over a few of the questions. Afterwards, we talk about the central idea of the story and the details to support the story. I also speak briefly with students on how to read a story with the goal of determining the central idea.