Hey, Boo: Mockingbird Makes Its Exit

Print Lesson

Objective

SWBAT review the final chapters of To Kill a Mockingbird through their own focus questions, followed by the conclusion of the film.

Big Idea

Saying goodbye to Maycomb.

Reading Quiz

15 minutes

My students were required to read the final four chapters (28-31) of To Kill a Mockingbird for this last reading quiz.  The list of questions I have developed, from which to select five in each class, include:

  • Where are Jem and Scout walking to on Halloween night?
  • Who scares them on their way to their destination?
  • Who attacks them on their way home?
  • Who saves them when they are attacked?
  • What part of Jem's body is hurt?
  • What happens to Bob Ewell?
  • Who says "God damn it, I'm not thinking of Jem!"?
  • What is Heck Tate's theory for how Bob Ewell dies?
  • To whom does Atticus say "Thank you for my children"?
  • Who does Scout walk home?

The quiz is given orally and my students record their answers on quarter sheets of scratch paper.  It simply tests whether or not they have done their reading, and I will admit that this time, the answers are perhaps more obvious than in previous quizzes.  I have decided to do this because I have noticed that even my reluctant, must-light-a-fire-under-them-for-every-assignment students have fallen under the spell of this book, and I want to reward them with a strong reading quiz score on this last quiz, proving to them how great are the rewards when one does his/her reading!

Whole Group Review

20 minutes

 

Today we will review chapters 28-31 through the sharing of student focus questions.  Over the past few days, many of my students have been finishing the book ahead of schedule, unable to put it down once they were gripped by the events of chapter 28.  This will be their first opportunity to openly discuss the end of the book, without running the risk of giving anything away to their peers.

I anticipate that some students will be confused by what actually transpires in these chapters, including who actually kills Bob Ewell, whether or not to believe what Atticus believes (that Jem kills him), and whether or not Heck Tate's version of the event is true (that he fell on his knife).  This should open the door to some fresh analysis of character traits, as my students have come to accept Atticus as the voice of reason in the text, and Heck Tate as a utilitarian witness, at best, thus far.  And of course, finally being able to discuss Boo Radley with concrete, in-person evidence is something they have been waiting for since Part One.

The Film Concludes

35 minutes

 

Today, then, it makes sense to complete the film version of To Kill a Mockingbird, which my students have been watching in intervals throughout the unit.  I have not attached an assignment to this last viewing, satisfied that my students have explored the text v. film battle sufficiently in this lesson and in this lesson.

I do, however, expect that my students will have strong reactions to the end, especially to Boo Radley (it never fails to surprise them when they discover him hiding behind the bedroom door . . .). We will devote any remaining minutes of the period to whole group sharing of reactions to the film and how it stacks up against the text.