The Look and Feel of Your Final Blog: A Summative Assessment

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Objective

SWBAT self-assess the quality of their own blog before receiving their final grade for it!

Big Idea

... blogging is a ubiquitous form of academic, professional, and personal expression ...

Introduction and Context

10 minutes

 [THIS IS THE 7th PART OF 7 PARTS IN A SEQUENCE OF LESSONS FOR THE FIRST "MINI-UNIT" OF THIS SEMESTER.] 

Given that students have received a "formative assessment" of their course blogs (see the previous lesson), it is now time to review with them the requirements for their final, "summative assessment." This last lesson, then, comes at the end of the course, so it is crucial to review the components of the "formative assessment" in order to trigger student recall.  Complete this in any manner you see fit, but as a suggestion simply re-project your own "sandbox" blog and click thought the expected sections and components of the "formative."  

As the "summative assessment" score sheet indicates, students should NOT delete any of their previous content.  This final assessment of blogs is built upon the previous one, and the technical procedures for adding content are the same as previous procedures.  However, you will want to review the methods for adding media, gadgets, and additional posts as well as reviewing the procedures for layout and design changes.  (Some of the more advanced aspects of these "new" procedures are covered in my attached screencast.)    

I set a formal deadline for all content requirements for the "summative assessment" in the last week of the course.

Once the deadline is in place, students do have class time and (of course) homework time to complete the required work, which breaks down into four major categories:

  1. personality and aesthetics
  2. media and functionality
  3. quality of peer interaction
  4. quality of writing

On the appointed date, I will begin my summative evaluation of the state of their blogs, and, as you see in the attached .pdf score sheet, I rank these four areas across four distinctions: excellent, proficient, lacking, or missing.

Guided Practice: Your Self-Assessment

35 minutes

Yet ... before I complete my actual check for points in my grade book, I distribute the attached .pdf, and I explain the content of each of the four expected sections.  Students have paper copies of this score sheet, and I drive to several examples of better student blogs -- the model ones -- on the classroom screen.  

Using some of the better blogs in my three classes, I walk students though a mock evaluation.  Then, they have an opportunity (with my assistance) to self-assess, using the actual score sheet that I will use.  The bulk of the class period, then, is devoted to self-reflection and self-review of the state of student blogs on this day.

Generally speaking, students find a few areas of personal concern and needing improvement and/or embellishment BEFORE the deadline of the summative assessment/check.

Here are links to some example blogs.  (These are among the better ones I collected at the end of the spring of 2014.)