Perspective Makes All The Difference: Sharing Character Point of View

1 teachers like this lesson
Print Lesson

Objective

SWBAT present conclusions about character clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning through a jigsaw group presentation of their character interviews.

Big Idea

"Atticus was right...you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them." --Jean Louise "Scout" Finch

Introduction & Welcome: It's Zipper Day!

3 minutes

I open class with a welcome to Zipper Day. On this day in 1913, the Zipper was patented. In honor of this day, I explain what the "YKK" on so many zippers stands for: Yoshida Kōgyō Kabushiki Kaisha, The Yoshida Manufacturing Group. As always, Daily Holidays serve to engage students and build a sense of community in the classroom. 

Jigsaw Grouping: Sharing Character Point of View

40 minutes

As students enter the classroom today, they are given a number; this is the jigsaw group they report to for the sharing of Step Four of Perspective Makes All The Difference. Students are asked to identify which group they're in by a show of hands, and then students separate their desks into four groups of six. 

Students share their answers to the questions we compiled in class  (Example 1: Per. 3 QuestionsExample 2: Per. 6-8 Questions), providing the members of their groups to take notes on each character's reactions to the interview questions, such as with sharing student examples of Jem, and of Tom Robinson (this video demonstrates wait time).

By presenting this information and supporting evidence clearly so that jigsaw group members can follow the line of reasoning and characterization (SL.9-10.4), the "experts" demonstrate how complex characters interact with other characters and develop the themes (RL.9-10.3) of the novel, particularly as Scout is exposed to courage, education, and prejudice. 

In order to grasp each character's point of view, students use their reading of the novel and interview questions to distinguish what is directly stated in the text by Scout from how each character may perceive the action of the scene (RL.11-12.6). For example, what would Jem say happened? (student answer, "That darn fool girl started talking like Mr. Cunningham was her best friend.") Or, for another example, how did Dill feel? (student answer: "I was so scared, all the men looked so big and mean, and Scout was so small, and I knew I could lick one of them inna fight, but all of 'em, we'd need the whole L&M Railroad!"). We are working at the 11-12 band because students are drawing conclusions based on another character's point of view, and "To Kill a Mockingbird" is an American novel. 

From the information they note today, students will create a paragraph describing the action from their character's point of view, demonstrating both understanding of the scene and understanding of their peers' conclusions (W.9-10.10). Students have three days to plan and complete this writing sample, to account for completion of Literature Circle assignments and work on their creative projects.

 

Perspective Paragraph: Writing from a Particular Point of View

5 minutes

We take a few minutes to clarify the directions for the written component of this assignment, and answer any questions students may have.

From the information they note today, students will create a paragraph describing the action from their character's point of view, demonstrating both understanding of the scene and understanding of their peers' conclusions (W.9-10.10). Students have three days to plan and complete this writing sample, to account for completion of Literature Circle assignments and work on their creative projects.


Two-Minute Warning: Wrap-Up & Reminders

2 minutes

With two minutes remaining, I ask students to move their desks back into rows, and provide an opportunity to ask any questions they may have regarding the written paragraph portion of this assignment (due in three days).