"Write On!" for Teamwork

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Objective

SWBAT compose and illustrate an informational paragraph on Teamwork.

Big Idea

Together we are better!

Prepare the Learner

10 minutes

Students sing the song “Teamworkone time all the way through.   I have the words on a chart near the SmartBoard to help both me and the kids with  the words!

 

 

 I use this song because it does a great job of reviewing all of the aspects of a team that we will discuss throughout this unit!  

Interact with text/concept

45 minutes

Team Time! CD

I have this story Team Time! on CD.  The reader is animated and there are sound effects in the background, so students are very engaged!  It is a fun way to do a third read of the text.  We listen to the story all the way through one more time without stopping. 

 

We then revisit the two focus questions: What is teamwork?  and  How does working together get the job done?  I ask for evidence from the text to support their answers.

 

I do this to make sure students got the big idea of the read.  This is a check for understanding and guided practice in citing evidence from the text.

 

Talk/Write Off the Map

I bring students to the carpet and we look at our map from yesterday.  I ask: Who remembers what we talked about yesterday?´ I do this to activate prior knowledge and check for understanding. 

 

I ask:  Can someone read me what we wrote about?  What was our TOPIC? Who can read that from the center circle in our bubble map?  (choose someone to read aloud)

 

I continue: Today we are going to write off the map.  Everyone say “Write off the map.” (students repeat)  Who can tell me what that means?  (allow students to answer, prompt if necessary)

 

I then ask students to go back to their seats and take out their pencils while I pass out writing paper.

 

I say: Put your name and date on your paper and then wait for me. (students can do this independently by this time of year)

When students are ready, I ask: When we write off the map, what do we use for the first words in our sentence?  What do we begin our sentence with? (students respond “what’s in the middle circle” or “With teamwork we…”)  I continue: That’s right!  Let’s write that.  You can use my paper or copy from the middle circle, but start on your top(first) line and write ‘With teamwork we’ then put your pencil down and look at me so I know you are ready for the next part of our sentence. 


While students are writing their linguistic pattern ‘With teamwork we’ I am monitoring and assisting where necessary.  I do this to offer that 1:1 assistance that is so crucial for students because it allows me to differentiate my prompts and instruction according to individual needs.

 

I say: Boys and girls, where should we start with our ideas?  What ideas should we write first?  See? Hear? Can?  I take student replies and usually start with ‘see’ because it is near the top and it is a fairly known sight word by my students by this time of year.  I prompt:  Let’s write ‘see’ after our words ‘With teamwork we’ so that it says ‘With teamwork we see’  I model it on my paper on the document camera and students write ‘see ‘ on their paper.

 

I continue:  What does the first ‘see’ bubble say?  What was our first idea yesterday when we were brainstorming our ideas?  (sharing)  Excellent.  Let’s write ‘sharing’ after our words ‘With teamwork we see’  I model it on my paper on the document camera and students write ‘sharing’ on their paper.  I ask: What goes last in a sentence? (period)  Don’t forget to put your period at the end of your sentence!


When everyone is done I prompt:  Let’s read that sentence together.  Use your finger to read.  Fingers ready?  I touch my words on the document camera and students track their words on their papers as we read the sentence together.

 

I say: Boys and girls, let’s cross off our idea ‘sharing’ because we already wrote that idea and we don’t want to write it twice.  We X out the ‘sharing ‘ bubble.

 

I continue: Now we are ready for our next sentence.  Who remembers what we write first in our sentence? (With teamwork we)  Yes, let’s write that again.  If you have space on your first line, you can use the rest of that space and begin after your period.  I am like a broken record with this from day 1 to the last day of school.  Young writers love to start on a new line for every sentence and that is a hard habit to break/unteach.  Modeling it over and over is the most effective way I’ve found to get the kids to do it with automaticity.

 

I continue: If you don’t have space, what do you do? (go around and down)  I emphasize this because the return sweep can be tough for young writers, so I model it constantly.  (allow time for students to write the sentence stem again)

 

I prompt: Let’s write a ‘hear’ idea now!  Who can come up to my bubble map and touch the word ‘hear.’  (a volunteer comes up and touches the word ‘hear’)  Excellent!  Let’s write ‘hear’ after our ‘With teamwork we’ words for our next sentence.  (I write ‘hear’ and students write it on their own papers) As students are writing, I assist and monitor quickly to make sure everyone is with me.  I do a quick ‘sweep’ of the room and tend to check those writers who usually struggle. 

 

I say: Who can read me one of our ‘hear’ ideas that we wrote yesterday?  (I take two volunteers, one for each word)  Boys and girls, you can choose ONE ‘hear’ word to write in your sentence.  I am going to choose ______. Watch me as I write that word.  (I write my word on may paper) 

 

I ask:  What do I put after the last word in a sentence?  (period) Help me read my sentence.  I touch, you read.  Ready?  This is a familiar prompt I use with my students.  They know that when I say that I am going to track the words, but they have to read them. 

 

I prompt:  Now you pick the ‘hear’ word you want to write.  If you want ___ write that one.  If you want ___, write that one.  Do you write both?  (no)  How many do you write? (one)  Pick one now and write it after your ‘With teamwork we hear’ words.  And what do you put after you write your last word? (period)

 

When everyone is done I prompt:  Let’s read that sentence together.  Use your finger to read.  Fingers ready?  I touch my words on the document camera and students track their words on their papers as we read the sentence together.

I say: Boys and girls, let’s cross off our idea ‘___’ because we already wrote that idea and we don’t want to write it twice.  We X out the ‘___ ‘ bubble.

I direct: Now I want you to do the same thing with a ‘can’ idea.  You first need to write your middle bubble words, then ‘can’ and last you choose ONE ‘can’ idea to write off the map.  Any questions? 


I do this as the last step of gradual release of responsibility.  I usually follow the pattern: I do.  We do.  You do.  This writing activity follows that pattern.  Common Core standards challenge students to be college and career ready and a huge part of that is taking ownership of your work and learning.  Gradual release of responsibility encourages just that!

 

As students are writing, I am monitoring and assisting where necessary.  I offer students the individual 1:1 instruction and prompts that they need to help them with any struggles they are having.

 

Depending on time, I will let the students write another sentence on their own, as well.

 

Extend Understanding

30 minutes

Students illustrate their writing.  I let students choose one or two of their ideas to illustrate.  I stress that their pictures need to have details.  We review our illustration rubric to remind students what good illustrators include in their pictures.

 

Common Core stresses illustrations as a necessary and meaningful piece of both reading and writing.  We discuss characteristics of both pictures and illustrations so students understand their importance.