We Are A Team!

3 teachers like this lesson
Print Lesson

Objective

SWBAT participate in an unencumbered read of a nonfiction text and differentiate the vocabulary ‘group’ and ‘team.’ SWBAT complete a Tree Map about their favorite team.

Big Idea

Together we are better!

Prepare the Learner

10 minutes

Students listen to the song “Teamwork” one time all the way through.  I then play the song again, stopping it in chunks and have students repeat that chunk of the song to help them learn it.  I have the words on a chart near the SmartBoard to help both me and the kids with the words!

 

:09  Let’s make a team.  Be lots of fun.  Join forces you and me.  Two heads are better than one.

:18  Let’s make a team.  Give ourselves a name.  Have our very own cheer. And bust out some A-Game!

:32  T is working together.  E is everybody counts.  All for one and one for all.  M let’s motivate each other!

:41  It’s fun to play and be a good sport.  Try hard and compete.  We can do it ten times better if we work as a team!

 

I play :41-:47 without stopping.  The kids tend to pick this up after a few times listening to the song, so  I don’t have them repeat this part because it gets very time consuming if you stop after every few lines.

 

I stop there and tell the students we will learn the rest of the song tomorrow.

 

I use this song because it does a great job of reviewing all of the aspects of a team that we will discuss throughout this unit!

Interact with text/concept

45 minutes

Team Time!

Team Time! Looks at many kinds of teams.  We will be reading about the value of teamwork and the traits of a team.  We will learn: Teamwork makes a job easier.  Teamwork is essential in any culture.

 

I remind students: Good readers relate to what they are reading.  They make personal connections.  If we read something today that you know about, raise your hand and let me know!  Share with the group!

I say: We are going to read a book about real people who work together in teams.  Let’s browse the book.  Remember, when we browse, what do we do? (look at pictures and scan words with our eyes and think about what the text will be about) First, let’s read the title. 

I read the title, Team Time!  And run my finger under the title as I read.  I ask: What do you think this story will be about?   I point to the author’s name (Rebecca Allen) and ask for a volunteer to explain what an author does. I do this to remind kids that knowing the title and author are important because we can get information from them.  When students get older, they will be capable of reading series books by one author.  They may find that they like an author’s style or their characters, so knowing who an author is will increasingly become important.  I lay the foundation for that in kindergarten.

 

I show them the words group, team.  I explain that a group and a team are a lot alike.  I ask: Who has on a red shirt?  If you have on a red shirt come up to the front of the room and stand together.


We discuss that these students are a group with red shirts.  I then ask the rest of the class to come up and make another group of colored shirts.  We discuss that these students are a group with colored shirts/not red.  I then give the groups a job to do.

 

I bring a pile of books from our classroom library and ask each group to figure out the fastest way to get the books back to the library.  When the groups have completed their jobs we discuss what they did.  I ask:  How did you get the job done? (accept student explanations)  I explain: When a group works together to get a job done, that group is called a team.

 

 I almost always (sometimes there just isn't an action) give the students some TPR (Total Physical Response) to help them remember the word.  I prompt with: How can we SHOW 'group?'  .  How can we SHOW 'team?'  These responses/actions really help the kids understand the words and their meaning because they DID something to represent the word.



I then do a first read of Team Time!  I read the entire selection, stopping occasionally to verify vocabulary and tie the text to the pictures.  The first read is, for the most part, unencumbered.  I want the kids to get the gist of the text.  This will set them up for the close reads that we do during our next two reads in subsequent lessons.  

 

Extend Understanding

30 minutes

My Team tree map

I bring students back to the carpet and have the students think of their favorite team.  It can be a sports team, a team they work with or a team they play a game with.  I ask: How many people does it take to make a team? (more than one)  Can you and your mom working on your homework be a team effort? (yes)  What goal are you trying to accomplish? (finishing homework)  Can you and your friends looking for a four leaf clover in the grass be a team effort?   (yes)  What goal are you trying to accomplish? (finding a good luck four leaf clover) 

 

At this age, most kids will choose a team that they play with, so I want to raise awareness of other team opportunities that they might not think about otherwise.

 

I show them the tree map and say: I want you to draw me a picture of your favorite team activity in the top box.  It can be with any team you like, but remember that it is teamwork if you are working together to get a job done.  I want to be able to tell what your job is from your illustration, so add plenty of details.  Any questions?


I pass out papers and give students about 10-15 minutes to work on their illustrations.  I assist and monitor as they are drawing.  If students say they are done, I check their work and ask them guiding questions like “What job are you doing as a team in this picture?”  if it is unclear as to the team or the job.  I have my kids illustrate first so they have a concrete reference point to help guide their writing.

 

Illustration to Tree Map

I call their attention back to my paper on the document camera.  I have drawn my own picture (washing the car) I say: This is me and my son washing my car.  Can we be a team? (yes)  What job are we trying to complete? (wash the car)  I am going to write our TOPIC in the top rectangle.  What is our TOPIC? (team)  Let’s write ‘My team’ in the top rectangle because that is our topic.  (I write on my paper on document camera and students write on their paper)

 

I ask: What is the first word under our topic? (is)  Let’s read the topic and that first word together.   We read “My team is” chorally.”  I want you to think about your team that you drew in your picture and think about what your team IS. 


I think aloud: My team is me and my son.  My team is small.  My team is working together.  Hmmm….I think I am going to write ‘My team is me and my son.’  So under the ‘is’ work I am going to write ‘me and my son.’  I write as students watch. 

 

I direct: Now I want you to write me something that tells me what your team IS.  Put your words under your is word like I did.  Can you write ‘me and my son’ like I did?  (no)  Why not?  (because we don’t have a son)  Yes, make sure your ‘is’ words match your picture of your team!  I give students about 3-5 minutes to think about and write their ‘is’ word(s). 

 

I ask: What is the second word under our topic? (has)  Let’s read the topic and that first word together.   We read “My team has” chorally.”  I want you to think about your team that you drew in your picture and think about what your team HAS. 


I think aloud: My team has soap and water.  My teamhas a bucket.  My team has a sponge.  Hmmm….I think I am going to write ‘My team has soap and water.’  So under the ‘has’ word I am going to write ‘soap and water.’  I write as students watch. 

 

I direct: Now I want you to write me something that tells me what your team HAS.  Put your words under your ‘has’ box like I did.  I give students about 3-5 minutes to think about and write their ‘has’ word(s). 

 

I ask: What is the third word under our topic? (can)  Let’s read the topic and that first word together.   We read “My team can” chorally.”  I want you to think about your team that you drew in your picture and think about what your team CAN. 


I think aloud: My team can wash the car.  My team can work hard.  My team can have fun while we work.  Hmmm….I think I am going to write ‘My team can wash the car.’  So under the ‘can’ work I am going to write ‘wash the car.’  I write as students watch. 

 

I direct: Now I want you to write me something that tells me what your team CAN do.  Put your words under your ‘can’ word like I did.  I give students about 3-5 minutes to think about and write their ‘is’ word(s). 

 

I collect student maps and save them until the next day when we will talk and write of the map.

Teamwork tree map explanation