PIE Me, Author's Purpose

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Objective

SWBAT to explain with evidence the reason or purpose an author wrote a particular piece of writing.

Big Idea

Using the acronym Purpose, Entertain, Inform to evaluate and explain with evidence the author's purpose between different selections of text.

Let's Make a Pie

5 minutes

I start by creating an anchor chart. As I draw the circle, I ask the class to get out their white board, marker, and a pencil and to draw the circle on their board. I then ask the class to divide their circle into thirds. I model this on the anchor chart. 

I then ask them to turn to their elbow partner and talk about all the reasons an author might write a certain text. I have them keep track of their thinking on the outside portions of the circle they drew. As they discuss, I walk around and monitor what is being said and try to guide their discussions or ask questions that promote more thinking. 

Slices of Examples

5 minutes

With the brainstorm complete, they can now help me fill in the pieces of Pie Anchor Chart. I do this by first asking them to share what they discussed in partners. I then ask them to help determine why the author might have written specific books that we have read already this year. I first need to know what are the main three reasons authors write book. 

The class can quickly come up with entertain, so I ask them to give examples of books or other text that was written to entertain. I then ask them to look at their lists and try to figure out the other two pieces of the pie. I prompt them through and they begin to recall from their previous learning, inform and persuade. I write these onto our pie slices and then help the class define each one. 

Choosing the Purpose

5 minutes

With a basic outline of what each of the author's purpose complete, I am now going to shoe different books that we have read throughout the year and have them decide on what the purpose might be for each one. We are going to do this by playing a game using our white boards. 

When I show a book, the class will write an E, I, or P to show which type of purpose the author used. I will then say "show me" and the class will raise their boards and I will confirm their answers. I do this with text and books we have read. Figuring the difference between persuade and inform can be tricky so multiple examples is always good.