Editing and Revising Your Writing

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Objective

SWBAT re-read their writing and make edits with the help of others.

Big Idea

It's not always perfect; but we want it to be!

Why this Lesson?

1 minutes

In order for our students to be successful writers, it is important that they be able to edit their own work.  When we teach our students to read back over their work, we are teaching them two things: 1- how to build fluency, and 2- how to be responsible for high-quality work.  Once students really learn how to go through the practice of editing their work, they will eventually begin to edit automatically and that is our end goal!

I think it is crucial for us to teach our students how to edit AND revise.  In Kindergarten, it is only to our benefit to have students read and re-read their work and genuinely think about it and improve it.  I like to leave up my editing and revising reference chart to remind students of the importance of these skills!

The Process of Editing

15 minutes

At the beginning of the year, I conference with my students so they can see my expectations for their editing.  However, as the year goes on, I expect students to be able to edit their own writing.

To initially teach editing, when I conference with my students, I follow this process:

1- I ask the student to read me their writing.
(Anything a student cannot read gets a line under it- it will need to be replaced.)

2- I remind the student to check for punctuation and capitalization, as well as spacing.
(Students can add in punctuation and can erase lower-case letters that need to be capitalized.)

3- I remind the student fix any misspelled sight words or easy to spell blends and digraphs.
(Students do this by checking the word wall.)

4- I remind the student to change any words that do not make sense.
(Students may need to fix verb tenses, is and are, etc.)

*** When students conference with me, they have a red pen and I have a blue one.  We do this because I like for students to see the changes we are making.  I like for students to be able to go back and see all of the things that they noticed and improved upon in red, while also being able to see some of the things that I needed to guide them on in blue.
(This really helps me when assessing as well!)


For students to being their independent editing, they follow this process:

1- Students re-read their own writing.
   (This builds fluency and helps them them recognize their own strengths and weaknesses.)

2- Students look for the simple things they might be missing:
- Have I used punctuation correctly?
- Have I use capitalization correctly?
- Have I properly spaced my writing?

3- Students look for mistakes in their words:
- Have I spelled my sight words correctly?
- Have I spelled everything the way that it sounds?

4- Students re-read their words just to make sure it flows well.

***When students edit independently, they use a red pen.  If they choose to work with a partner for editing, their partner will also use a blue pen.  Students always have the option to work with someone else to edit- your friends can give you constructive criticism. 
Whether students work alone or with a partner to edit, I think it is important to use pens over the pencil.  I like for students to see the changes that are being made.  I like for students to be able to go back and see all of the things that they noticed and improved upon.

The best way to teach this to students and make sure that they understand it is to have a student do some editing for me.

The Process of Revising

15 minutes

At the beginning of the year, I conference with my students so they can see my expectations for their revising.  However, as the year goes on, I expect students to be able to revise their own writing.

To initially teach revising, when I conference with my students, I follow this process:

1- I ask the student to read me their writing.

2- I remind the student to change any words that do not make sense or that they are uncomfortable with.

3- I have encourage students to add any extra adjectives or verbs that can make their writing better; this allows them to strengthen their writing even more, in a personal way.

*** I have students use a red pen for revising, as well as editing.  I like for them to use this because it really helps me see what types of changes they are making.

As the year moves on, I like to remind students that the constructive criticism of others can be used to benefit us!  I always say, "What others see and tell us about our work reminds us that they can interpret it differently."  I think it is good to build a culture of helping each other while also learning that when others see flaws, that is okay.  With students keeping that in mind, I encourage them to make revisions on their own and then check with a partner!

For students to complete their independent revising, they follow this process:

1- Students re-read their own writing.
   (This builds fluency and helps them them recognize their own strengths and weaknesses.)

2- Students look for words that they think may need to be changed, so it makes more sense.

3- Students look for places where they can add new adjectives or verbs to strengthen their ideas.

4- Students re-read their words just to make sure it flows well.

***When students revise independently, they use a red pen (just as when they edit).  I like for students to see the changes that are being made and I like for students to be able to go back and see all of the things that they noticed and improved upon.  Also, since I like for students to work with a partner (or partners) when revising, I encourage them to also have a blue pen for those markings.  I think it is important for both the students and myself to see the different changes and suggestions that have been made.

The best way to teach this to students and make sure that they understand it is to have a student do some revising for me.

Assessing Our Editing and Revising

10 minutes

After edits and revisions have been made (whether done with me, with a partner or done individually), students go and re-read their draft one more time before they put it inside of their writing folder.  They will use this corrected draft for the following lesson or day when they will will create a final draft.

I do not assess editing or revising until I see students' final drafts.  I like to see their changed versions compared to their final drafts to see the changes that were implemented.  I like being able to notice that students did indeed fix things and then re-write them correctly when they tried again. 

When editing, I take into account the colors of the pen on the papers- if the student made most of the corrections and changes in red, in their pen, that is great because they were able to figure our their own needs.  If there is a lot of blue on their paper, from my pen, it means that students were unable to see where they needed to improve upon their writing.  This plays a role in my assessment, as I truly want students to be doing most of the editing!
When revising, I take into account the amount of red revisions made.  I think it is important that all students make at least one revision to show me that they are trying to find things to improve about their writing.  When I assess, I make sure that students have attempted ti revise things and I also look for students who have made multiple, helpful revisions.