Character Analysis: Defending the Antigone Fever Chart, (3 of 3)

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Objective

SWBAT analyze how complex characters develop over the course of the text by analyzing character quotes, categorizing character traits and supporting their findings with text evidence organized by a line graph. .

Big Idea

Does presenting make lessons more rigorous? Let me show you how it does.

Warm Up

5 minutes

Before we begin presenting our Antigone Fever Charts, I ask students to develop a short list of norms to abide by during presentations.  Rather than have a long list of rules in my classroom, I prefer to develop situations norms together.  Of course, rules about respect apply to all classroom situations, but I want students to view regular classroom, socratic seminar, presentations, silent reading time, as all separate events that we treat a little differently.  For example, ear buds might be acceptable for silent reading time, but not presentations (SL.9-10.1b).  Asking students to help develop these allows them to be conscientious of their surrounds and experiences.  

The norms students developed today:

While our classmates are presenting, we will

square our shoulders to the presenters and look them in the eye

keep our headphone/earbuds/phones away

ask questions if we are unsure of something

applause nicely at the end

Presenting the Antigone Fever Chart

30 minutes

I love asking students to present!  When they present, students own their hard work.  I watch students stand in front of their peers, explaining their analysis and I realize how proud they are of their work.  Plus, being a good listener is a life skill and students need multiple opportunities to practice this skill.  

This video of students presenting Fever Chart demonstrates students presenting their analysis and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning (SL.9-10.4).  During the presentation, students explain their complex character development over the course of Antigone (RL.9-10.3).  They also explain their strong and thorough text evidence to support their analysis of what the text says explicitly and inferences from the text (RL.9-10.1). I ask students to present the way they do today because it is good practice for individual presentations that will come later.  I simply broke down the SL.9-10.4 standard into an I Can statement that reads: I can present my analysis and supporting evidence clearly so my listeners can follow my line of reasoning, to assess the presentation.  I asked each student to tell me if they felt they accomplished the I Can statement and if we agreed, I awarded them a few points for the presentation.  Since this is a formative assessment, and their first time with a major presentation, I didn't apply a lot of points to it.  

These fever chart example and fever chart example 2 demonstrate the Antigone Fever Chart.

Using knowledge gained to write an essay

10 minutes

Now that students have completed the assignment and presentation, I want them to reflect on this unit.  Students will spend ten minutes writing me a reflection letter (W.9-10.10). 

Students,

Now that we have completed the Antigone unit, I want you to reflect on what you've learned. Please write me a letter which follows correct format.  In the introduction, please introduce yourself and explain how many absences you have had in the last three weeks.

In the first body paragraph, please explain your role in your group Antigone Fever Chart project.  Be very specific about your work ethic and contribution to your group.  

Now that you have analyzed characters, conflict and learned about Greek Tragedy, make a final decision about who the Tragic Hero of Antigone is.  Make sure you explain how/why you came to this conclusion.

In your final body paragraph, explain at least two additional things you would like to know about Greek Tragedy, Antigone, reading in general, characterization, etc.  

Finally, finish your letter by writing a professional conclusion and signing your letter.  

Sincerely,

Ms. Thompson