Write the Room-Place Value

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Objective

Students will be able to count base ten blocks and record numbers using their knowledge of "tens" and "ones".

Big Idea

Kindergarten students love to move! This station activity get students moving around the room as they work with place value.

Introduction

10 minutes

This is an activity that I use as one of my math stations, so there is not a formal introduction to this lesson. The stations are very briefly discussed at the beginning of the week. This takes approximately 10 minutes. I am fortunate to have a para-pro and parent helper each day of the week during my station time, so they are able to assist students, keep them on task, and work with them at stations. With 3 adults in the room, instructions are able to be brief, as anyone who is having difficulty will be noticed. My station activities always target skills that we have previously or are currently learning.

During station time, my students are broke into 2 groups (12 students in each group- totaling 24). On Mondays & Wednesdays, group 1 is working on stations, while group 2 is using technology. Technology includes iPads, lap tops, and the SMARTBoard. On Tuesdays & Thursdays, group 2 is working on stations, while group 1 is using technology. Fridays are free choice. All students use technology and re-visit any of their favorite stations from the week. I have included a picture of my schedule that is displayed in my classroom.

Write the Room Place Value

20 minutes

The material I used for this station was a free download on TeachersPayTeachers by Shuna Pocket Full of Kinders. The unit is titled, Place Value Rocks. You do have to have a Teachers Pay Teachers account to access this material.

I did not utilize the entire packet. I focused on the place value writing the room activity. I cut out and placed 10 pictures around the classroom. Each picture had "tens" sticks and/or "ones" cubes. Students have to count the base ten blocks, and write the number on a response sheet. The response form includes the numbers 1-10. So in this activity, if I came across a picture hanging in the classroom that was labeled 3, I would count the base ten blocks and record the number next to 3 on the response form. I have included a student video of this.

I really like this station because it leads my students to help one another. Naturally, students tend to buddy up as they search the room for the ten place value cards. I can observe and hear their conversations. If a student counts the base ten blocks incorrectly, their buddy will correct them typically by saying something like, "No, look there are only 3 "tens" sticks. That is 30." The students are using mathematical vocabulary (MP6), defending their thinking (MP3), and having fun at the same time!