Discussing "Where's the Big Bad Wolf?"

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Objective

SWBAT describe the characters, setting, and key details in the story and help the teacher record the details on a circle map.

Big Idea

Today we are going to be "dissecting the story" so to speak. We are going to discuss the story in great detail so we can compare and contrast our two stories in our Day 3 lesson.

Teacher Background Knowledge and Preparation

     Today's lesson is much like our Day 1 lesson.  We are going to be analyzing our story and digging in deep so we know the story well by the end of the lesson.  I have a language rich classroom that includes a great deal of talking among partners and as a class.  In today's lesson I will be asking many questions about the story that the students will have to answer using evidence from the text.  This addresses standard RL1.1.   When students actually cite text evidence as part of their answer, they are being very specific, which is exactly what I want them to do.  When they use details and cite text evidence they are addressing standard RL1.3Just like in yesterday's lesson, this book does a great job with telling the story from another point of view.  Today the story is told from the perspective of "Detective Doggedly".  We will discuss what the author did to make the reader see a different side to the story.  This addresses standard RL1.6. When we talk about who is telling the story, I am going to point out the clue vocabulary in our story.  The very first page of the story does a great job of explaining who the story teller is.  When we start talking about who the story teller is, we are setting the foundation for our students so they in future years can talk about perspective in stories.

     The eventual goal is for my students to compare and contrast our two stories.  When we do that we are addressing standard RL1.9.

     For today's lesson you'll need the book "Where's the Big Bad Wolf?" by Eileen Christelow. You'll also need the Smartboard Three Pigs and Wolf Compare and Contrast or Activboard Three Pigs Compare and Contrast  lesson so you can record the information on the circle map.  You'll also need  the list of questions Questions to Ask For 3 Pigs Stories so you won't have to flip back and forth to the answer key on the Smartboard lesson. 

Reading and Discussing the Story

20 minutes

     After I partnered up my students and they decided who would be Person 1 and Person 2, I had them come to the carpet and sit in front of the Smartboard.  I started with the objective and overview.  I said, "Today we are going to read another 3 Pigs story.  We are going to talk in depth about the characters, setting, and events in the story.  You'll get a chance to talk to your partner about the story and then we'll record our information on the circle map."

     I started to read the story and read to page 9.  Then I said, "My question is - What happened after the wolf sneezed the straw house down? Person 1- you are going to speak and Person 2 - you are going to listen and respond.  Go." Once students were done discussing the details from the story I continued on with the story. 

     I read to page 18.  After I read that page I said, "My question is - What made the house of sticks come down? Person 2 - now it's your turn to speak and Person 1 - you will listen and respond. Go." 

     We continued on with the story.  I would stop and ask questions and partners would take turns being the speaker and the listener.  Here are the remaining questions that I asked:

  • What happened to the pigs after the house of sticks fell down?
  • Did the pigs have any help keeping the wolf away? 
  • Why did the wolf say when he was in jail? 
  • Who is telling the story in this book?
  • How did the wolf feel throughout the story?
  • What happened to the wolf at the end of the story?

Answering Questions and Recording the Details on a Circle Map

15 minutes

     Just like in yesterday's lesson it was time to discuss the story again and then record our information on the circle map.  I put my circle map ( page 9) on the Smartboard and said, "O.K. we are going to talk about the story again and record all our details on our circle map."  Partners had already discussed the story in the previous section, but, for my class, they needed lots of opportunities to discuss the story's key details in a supported way at this point. If your students are ready for more independence, you might have them work on their maps in pairs or on their own.  Here is the list of questions again that I asked my students:

  • What happened after the wolf sneezed the straw house down? 
  • What made the house of sticks come down? 
  • What happened to the pigs after the house of sticks fell down?
  • Did the pigs have any help keeping the wolf away? 
  • Why did the wolf say when he was in jail? 
  • Who is telling the story in this book?
  • How did the wolf feel throughout the story?
  • What happened to the wolf at the end of the story?

     After a student answered the question I would ask the rest of the group "Do you agree with that? Do we need to add anything?" Then I would record our information on the circle map.  You will see on the question sheet that I wanted each answer recorded in a different color.  This is so students can color code their double bubble map on the Day 3 lesson.  Students will begin to make the connection that the answer in one particular color on the circle map goes in the same color of bubble on the double bubble map for Day 3.  Color coding helps young students such as our first graders to locate and organizer their information more independently.  You can see this step in the lesson by watching this video Discussing Our Story as a Class - Day Two 3 Pigs.

Closure

5 minutes

     As part of our closure, I once again had partners look at each other.  I said, " I want each of you to share at least one way of how today's story is different from yesterday's story." This is a great way to get them ready to contrast for tomorrow's lesson, and it's one more way for them to discuss the story. 

     I have also included a resource for you in this section 40 ways to leave a lesson  that gives you some ideas for closures.  I know closures are important, but doing a closure wasn't always my strong suit. I've really worked on making my closures fun and beneficial for my students.  These ideas help me and I hope they help you as well.