Statistical Questioning

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Objective

SWBAT determine when a question will result in answers where the answers will vary.

Big Idea

Statistical Questioning: Survey Says!

Curriculum Reinforcer

10 minutes

The curriculum reinforcer, is a daily practice piece that is incorporated into almost every lesson to help my students to retain skills and conceptual understanding from earlier lessons. My strategy is to use Spiraled Review to help my students retain what they learned during the earlier part of the year. This will help me to keep mathematical concepts fresh in the students mind so that the knowledge of these concepts become a part of students' long term memories.

Engagement

10 minutes

To start of this lesson, I will engage my students in a discussion over the following question: What is the main difference between the two questions below?

  • How old are you?
  • How old are the people in your neighborhood?

 

I will allow my students to provide me with several answers that I will jot down in a bulleted list on the board. We will look back at this list after discussing the meaning of a statistical question.

This activity is simply for the purpose of activating student thinking as it pertains to the types of questions a person can ask. When we look back at this later on in the lesson, it will be to help students to understand the significance of the difference between these two questions as far as how that difference relates to statistics.

Instructon & Teacher Modeling

10 minutes

In this instructional piece, I will use the discussion from the opening exercise to deepen my student’s understanding of statistical questions. I will be sure to emphasize that a statistical question is one that collects information that addresses differences in a population. For this reason, the question is presented in a way that allows for those differences. While explaining this, I will refer back to the opening exercise and allow students to contemplate how one question allows for differences, making it statistical, while the other does not.  

Try It Out

5 minutes

For the guided practice portion of this lesson, I have my students complete an activity where they will determine based upon the criteria provided, whether or not a question is statistical.

To do this, the students will be presented with a PowerPoint slide. This slide will contain several questions. The students will write down whether or not each question is statistical or non-statistical.

Independent Exploration

20 minutes

For the independent practice, the students will write five of their own statistical questions and five questions that are non-statistical in nature, that they would be able to ask their fellow classmates. Then, the students will choose one of the five statistical questions that they came up with and conduct a survey of their classmates.

 

The students will be allowed to move about the classroom to ask each individual student their statistical question. They will need to record their classmates’ responses in a logical manner. Then, they will need to answer the following questions:

 

    1. What makes your survey question statistical?
    2. After conducting your survey, what proof do you have, that your survey question is statistical?
    3. Can a non-statistical question become statistical? If so, how?
    4. Provide a situation, in which it would be important to understand the difference between statistical questions and non-statistical questions?

 

Teacher will then have students get with a partner to discuss the answers to these questions.

Closing Summary

15 minutes

Students Presentation:

Students will discuss their answers to the questions from the independent practice in a whole group discussion. I will bullet the important points made and students will take note of the bullet points.

1. What makes your survey question statistical?

2. After conducting your survey, what proof do you have, that your survey question is statistical?

3. Can a non-statistical question become statistical? If so, how?

4. Provide a situation, in which it would be important to understand the difference between statistical questions and non-statistical questions?

 

When questions are answered the teacher will turn some of the more important points into a bulleted list. For example:

What makes your survey question statistical?

  • It is an open ended question that could have multiple answers
  • The question is not specific to a single person’s tastes or interest
  • The question can cause polarity and difference in opinion

 

TOTD: Students will answer today’s essential question in writing.

Why is it important to understand the difference between statistical questions and non-statistical questions?