Who is August Wilson? Finding the Main Ideas and Supporting Details in an Obituary Using Chunking

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Objective

SWBAT identify the central ideas in an informational text by using THIEVES graphic organizer. SWBAT write an objective summary by synthesizing the main ideas in the informational text.

Big Idea

Why do we study August Wilson's plays? Let chunking lead you to the central ideas, and they will uncover the answer!

Backwards Design and Standards Alignment

The Performance Assessment for this unit on Fences by August Wilson will be based on the W.9-10.1a and W.9-10.1b standards. My students will be taking a position on an issue, creating claims and a counterclaim and developing one of their claims using evidence from the text they are reading, Fences, by August Wilson. This assignment will require my students to create two paragraphs, an introduction and one body paragraph.

To move my students from W.6.1a to W.9-10.a, I need to show them how to build develop the outline of a balanced argument, identifying a position with claims and counterclaims as well as how to develop a claim using evidence and explanation.

In addition to working on our writing, I want my student to begin to develop their listening and speaking skills. Presently, sharing their ideas in a collegial fashion will require purposeful action on our part. We need to practice mastering this skill on a daily basis. Therefore, I want to work on moving them along the standard strand from SL.6.1d to SL.9-10.1d. For SL.9-10.1d, we will work on connecting the ideas of several speakers. Students will be using discussion starters to build their speaking and listening skills.

 

Reflection on Yesterday...Focus for Today

Transfer Schools and Unit Planning: My challenges with the lesson.

Yesterday's lesson was quite illuminating in many ways. We started working on the use of T.H.I.E.V.E.S. as a pre-reading strategy focusing on THIS, but we only completed T and H, so today we need to complete I and S. 

In addition, we need to read the article, using chunking to find the remaining main ideas and supporting details as well as to identify context clues to explain unknown vocabulary in The New York Times article.

Chunking is breaking a longer text into shorter, more manageable parts. It is a great strategy for me to use while reading a text of complexity with my students so that we can access challenging text appropriately.

For today's lesson, the process of reading will involve:

(a) using title and subheadings to break the text into smaller chunks and to direct the reading of the text

(b) using the subheadings to identify main or central ideas

(c) identifying meaning of words using context clues

I am providing the August Wilson Biographical Sketch for those students who may need an alternate reference that is easily accessible so that we can complete the writing assignment, informational text W.9-10.2  or objective summary RI.9-10.2. Since the subheadings in the biographical sketch are easily identifiable, this will be a great opportunity for me to see whether my students can turn these subheadings into questions.

I am using T.H.I.E.V.E.S. to provide my students with the opportunity to survey the text and to get a sense of what it is about so that they will be less intimidated by the fact that they are going to read an article from The New York Times. In addition, I want to use T.H.I.E.V.E.S. to identify the central or main ideas in the article using the subtitles.

Since we will not be focusing on every letter in T.H.I.E.V.ES.- we chose T.H.I.S. - T for Title, H for Headings and Subheadings, I for Introduction and S for So What? Why does this matter?

In yesterday's lesson, we completed T for Title and H for Headings. So, today we will be focusing on I for Introduction and S for So What? Therefore, we will be able to read the article using the subheadings as a guide to develop our main ideas for the objective summary.

Warmup/Do Now

10 minutes

Today, for the Warmup, we will be reviewing the parts of the acronym, T.H.I.E.V.E.S., we completed on the T.H.I.E.V.E.S. Template in yesterday's lesson (we completed T for Title and H for Headings and subheadings. We will be using The New York Times article since we worked on it yesterday. If there are concerns, I will provide the biographical sketch from August Wilson Center in Pittsburgh, PA as additional support. 

When students receive the article, they will

1. Read the title and predict what the document is going to talk about in your own words. Write your response in your notebook. (Title)

2. Identify all sub-headings in the document and turn them into questions. (Headings)

Then, I will ask my students to write what they have learned about August Wilson from looking at the title and the subheadings. This response will be an informational or explanatory text. This task is aligned to W.6.2 as students will be working to meet the W.9-10.2 standard accordingly.

I am including samples of student work for this task. These writing samples were written during the Warmup based on yesterday's lesson

Student Warmup#1

Student Warmup#2

 

Share

10 minutes

For this part of the lesson, my students and I will continue to develop their speaking and listening skills. My students will share what they know so far about August Wilson from their pre-reading work in yesterday's lessons. This task is aligned to SL.6.1d.

I am including samples of paragraphs students read during the Share:

Student Share #1

Student Share #2


Engagement: Using THIEVES

20 minutes

For this part of the lesson, my students and I will continue working with the acronym THIS (part of THIEVES focusing on I and S. We will be using The New York Times Article though the biographical sketch will be provided as support for those students who need it. Students will be using the description of THIEVES and the THIEVES Template. This activity will prepare students to identify concrete facts and details about August Wilson that they may include in their informational paragraphs, W.9-10.2

The result of modeling THIEVES can be seen on this chart. I am including a sample of student working using THIEVES Template: Student#1.

I am including samples of student annotations of the biographical sketch: Page#1A, Page#2A, and Page#3A and Page#1B, Page#2B and Page#3B.

Shared Reading and Writing: Using THIEVES to Chunk Text

30 minutes

For this part of the lesson, my students and I will be reading the article in chunks using the subheadings as a guide. We will divide the reading into smaller chunks or sections and we will be reading to find the answers to the questions we generated using the subheadings:

Page 1-3: What have you learned about August Wilson from the Introduction?

Page 4-5: What was August Wilson's Fruitful Partnership?

Page 5-8: What was August Wilson's Atypical Education?

Page 8-10: What did August Wilson have to do with a legacy of stars?

__________________________________________________________________________

To read the text, we are:

(a) using title and subheadings to break the text into smaller chunks and to direct the reading of the text

(b) using the subheadings to identify main or central ideas

(c) identifying meaning of words using context clues

___________________________________________________________________________

This is a sample of the results of the shared reading and writing using Main Idea and Supporting Details and the results of the Context Clues. The purpose of this activity is to provide students with more information they may use to create either an objective summary or their informational paragraphs, W.9-10.2 and RI.9-10.2 respectively.

 

Closure

10 minutes

For this part of the lesson, my students will write either an informational paragraph W.9-10.2 or an objective summary about August Wilson's life, career and legacy RI.9-10.2. In yesterday's lesson, many students wrote informational paragraphs which led me to realize that I didn't achieve my overall objective.

Therefore, I want to give my students to choose one of the two writing tasks (W.9-10.2 and RI.9-10.2) so I can determine which students were able to find supporting details to anchor the central ideas we created for the article using the subheadings:

Page 1-3: What have you learned about August Wilson from the Introduction?

Page 4-5: What was August Wilson's Fruitful Partnership?

Page 5-8: What was August Wilson's Atypical Education?

Page 8-10: What did August Wilson have to do with a legacy of stars?

I am including samples of student work for these tasks

W.9-10.2: Student#1Student#2 and Student#3.

RI.9-10.2: Student #1 and Student #2