Blogging Re: College Scholarships

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Objective

SWBAT to blog about their experience completing a college application, thereby sharing their reflections with the world!

Big Idea

... after the complex process of finding and applying for a merit aid scholarship students should reflect in their own words to "close the loop" of learning ...

Introduction and Context

5 minutes

This lesson takes place several days and/or weeks after the last day of formative conferences for students and one day after the "official" due date for a scholarship application in my class.  It is important to note that many of the scholarships students actually applied for had their own due dates even further out, but I needed to pick a "drop dead" deadline for ALL scholarships so that students could get a grade from me for their quarter reports.

Your own school calendar will determine when to make the "proof packets" due, but, nonetheless, complete this blogging assignment some time very soon after your classroom deadline.  For me, we did this the day after the "proof packets" were due.

I point out to students this blog entry is the kind of blog entry they will complete on their blogs as the course moves forward, as this is the first "genuine" bit of blogging I have required thus far.

Blogging Time

25 minutes

After students log in and load my day-to-day agenda, Slides presentation, they select the day for this lesson.  On the slide I have this prompt:

Now that you have selected and applied for a merit scholarship, describe which scholarship (with its details) and why?  What did you learn about yourself during this process?  Why are you a good choice for this scholarship?  What will you do with the money if you win it?

After I read the prompt aloud from the classroom screen and answer any clarifying questions students have, I ask them to blog!  I, of course, circulate around the room offering support and encouragement and the occasional prod.

As students are working on their entry, I point out that the tone for this is blog-like -- that is I expect the entries to sound like actual bits of interesting writing rather than a plodding paragraph in "answer" to an assignment.  (As a note here, I try to maintain this advice as they blog at the several different points of the course.)

The attached video is a student "testimonial" about her scholarship process ...