Building Arrays

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Objective

SWBAT build simple arrays using verbal and written instructions.

Big Idea

In this lesson, students use the vocabulary columns and rows to build simple arrays using their bodies and counters.

Introduction/Hook

5 minutes

Today we are going to start learning about arrays.  You might not know what an array is but chances are you have seen a lot of arrays already in your life.  We’re going to start by building an array with our own bodies. In order to build an array, we need to know what the difference between a row and a column is.  A row goes side to side and a column goes up and down. 

I show visuals on an anchor chart (or on the Promethean board) such as....

Note:  You can also use the rows and columns on the rug to help discuss the difference between a row and a column.

Guided Practice

10 minutes
Now you are going to work with a partner to build arrays using counters (or something else small like cheerios, jelly beans, beans, etc.).  You will receive instructions about what your array should look like, then you will build the array, and then you will draw the array and answer the questions for each array.  Make sure that you are working with your teammate and answering every sentence using a complete sentence. 
As students work, walk around and check for understanding, ask guiding questions like:
  • How many rows does this array have?  
  • How many columns does it have?  
  • How many counters does this array have in all? How do you know? 
When finished, bring students back together and go over 1-2 of the practice problems.  Have students share their drawings and/or the arrays that they made with their counters and explain how they got each answer (MP3). 

Introduction to New Material

10 minutes

Lets build an array with four rows.  Each row needs to have three students in it.  I ask students to come forward and build an array with their bodies, as you can see in this picture of my students.  When finished ask students:  How many rows does this array have?  How many columns does this array have?  How many total students are in this human array?

An array is a way to arrange items so that we can easily count them.  Let’s try to make another human array.   Let’s make an array with two rows of five students. I ask students to come forward and build an array with their bodies.  When finished ask students:  How many rows does this array have?  How many columns does this array have?  How many total students are in this human array

Now that we have built arrays with our classmates we’re going to build arrays using counters. Hand out counters to students. On your white board build an array that has three rows of five.

When finished ask students:  How many rows does this array have?  How many columns does this array have?  How many total students are in this human array.

Depending on time, student engagement, and student understanding, do 2-5 more practice problems using counters.  Make sure that students are able to explain how many of each item are in each row and how many are in each column. 

Independent Practice

15 minutes

The Independent Practice is differentiated based on student ability.

Group A:  In need of intervention

Students  in group A will build arrays using cubes, counters, or another small object independently.  Students will  build the arrays and then draw each array after building it. Students in this group will receive teacher guidance throughout the independent practice period. 

Group B: Right on track! 

Students will build arrays using cubes, counters, or another small object independently.  Students will build the arrays and then draw each array after building it.

Group C : Extension

Students will draw arrays without using manipulatives. 

Closing

3 minutes

Today we built arrays using our bodies, our counters, and our brains (when we drew out our arrays). Tomorrow we will start to use number sentences to describe our arrays!