Speaking and Listening Practice For Story Order

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Objective

SWBAT talk their way through ordering the events in a story with a partner.

Big Idea

Together you can: Order it... Right it... Write it!

Why This Lesson?

1 minutes

Students need to have multiple exposures to beloved stories.  It is important for students to hear students repeatedly because they need to have fluency when they attempt to read it for themselves.  Also, with repeated readings, students get ample exposure to the main idea and details of stories so they are able to recall the information more easily.  Once students are comfortable with a story, they are better able to sequence it; story sequencing is a needed skill for many reasons.

An easy way to provide students with FUN ways to approach a familiar story is to put it into a format with words and pictures that they can manipulate!  Students LOVE talking to each other- they get to discuss something they are familiar with while also being able to agree with or challenge someone else.  I love activities like this because they provide students with another outlet to practice re-telling and summarizing while bouncing ideas off and checking with each other!

This is an activity that can easily be taught in conjunction with (or as a preface to) Independent Story Sequencing.  I love to do both of the activities together; especially when I first introduce the idea of sequencing.

How This Lesson Works

40 minutes

Before I have students try this independently, I will model my expectations for them.
This is an activity that I model for students at the beginning.  When I first introduce putting events from a story in order (sequencing), I make sure to show students how to do this.  I use lots of think-alouds, such as, "I know that this happened in the beginning because..." or "This was a very important event in the story because..."  I want my students to know what I expect before they get into practicing this task themselves. 
As the year progresses, I will gradually stop modeling each story for the students.  By the middle of the year, students should be able to complete this task by themselves with no explanation.  Students typically like reviewing familiar stories, so this is a reasonable expectation.

Once students are comfortable with my expectations as well as the process, they will be able to follow the following procedures:

-Students will review the story independently and/or with a partner.
   (It is important for students to personally connect with the story so they will be able to sequence it with more ease.  Also, students should not be expected to draw solely on prior knowledge of my readings, as it may cause some confusion or frustration.  In the end, when students play with the story for themselves, it helps them understand it much better.)

- After reviewing/reading, students will discuss the story with their partner using summarizing and sequencing skills (while also working on their speaking and listening skills).
   (When students talk through a story, it really helps them build a foundation for their future learning.  Also, when students practice their speaking and listening skills and connect them to a project, they are showing their ownership of the information needed for the project.  In summation, when students can speak about something, they truly know about it and they can write about it.)

- Students will compete their response sheet independently and/or finish their project and have it laid out so the teacher can check it.
   (It is important that students be held responsible for their own work.  When students have to complete an activity and either turn something in or explain their learning and reasoning to their teacher, they own their learning from that center.  With sequencing (a crucial skill for kindergarten), it is imperative that our students are able to be successful with familiar stories because it helps build their confidence and their foundational reading and writing skills.)

- Students will check their response sheet and/or answers with their partner.  Students will then make any edits and/or changes necessary to fit the story, according to the discussion with their partner.
   (I always have students check their work with a partner because I think it is important that they build off of each other.  When students check work with each other, they are not only practicing speaking and listening skills, but they are also justifying their answers and likely helping each other see the same work from a different viewpoint.  Students need to know that they are expected to work together to come to the very best answer or response.)

Assessing the Task

5 minutes

It is important that I assess my students' work and hold them accountable for their center.  I will always either check students' response sheets or have a conversation with students as they show me their work.

I will check students’ response sheets for the following:
Students must write their sentences in the appropriate order.
Students must use events only from the story.
Students must use legible handwriting, along with a command of grammar.

If response sheets were not used, I will check students' conversation for the following:
Students must be able to read their sentences in the appropriate order.
Students must be able to discuss the events from the story only.
Students must be able to justify why they put their sentences in specific places and make sense of their work to the teacher.

How to Change this Activity or Differentiate

10 minutes

It is very easy to create different levels of this activity.  In the beginning of the year, for example, I have some students who are able to write their own responses very well; however, I have some other students who trace their response sheet because they are unable to write independently. 
Also, I love to have a “leader” student who helps their partner check their response sheet and who talks through the story before they end their task.  In the end, I can easily differentiate this activity for different groups of students in a few ways.
This activity is really easy to mold to all different types of stories.
I love to change the response sheets for this type of activity- sometimes, like in this case, there is a set sequencing response sheet; other times, I might have a sheet about how the plot changed, what the problems and the solutions were or what the causes and effects were in a story.

Daily Differentiated Practice

5 minutes

It is very easy to create different levels of this activity.  In the beginning of the year, of example, I have some students who are able to write their own responses very well; however, I have some other students who trace their response sheet because they are unable to write independently. 
Also, I love to have a “leader” student who helps their partner check their response sheet and who talks through the story before they end their task.  In the end, I can easily differentiate this activity for different groups of students in a few ways.