Stars Stars Stars

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Objective

SWBAT identify the main idea and some details from the text when prompted . SWBAT participate in a guided writing of an informational piece about the stars on the American flag.

Big Idea

Patriotism is all around us.

Prepare the Learner

15 minutes

 

I read The Star Spangled Banner  sing and read storybook that is published by Scholastic.  I like this one because the illustrations help students understand the song and what is happening in it.  As I read, I am reinforcing the foundational skills of directionality (right to left progression), return sweep, turning pages, picture/text connection and fluency.  This song also supports the theme of Patriotism.  

 

 

 

 If you do not have the storybook,  you could use this video and song:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPKp29Luryc

 

After I read the book, I let the kids listen to the song.  I either show the video with the music or I play the song from a CD and flip the pages in The Star Spangled Banner storybook by Scholastic as the kids sing the words.

 

We discuss that another name for The Star Spangled Banner is ‘National Anthem.’  We add ‘national anthem’ to our dictionaries.

Interact with text/concept

45 minutes

Patritotism   by Lucia Raatma

Today we are continuing to read the second part of the text.

 

 

Page 10  After reading page 10, we go back and review the heading ‘Patriotism in Sports.’   The first sentence tells us the main idea of the page is about showing pride during the Olympic games.  I say:  .  My favorite sport is baseball.  Turn and tell your partner what your favorite sport is.  If students are struggling I prompt them with the linguistic pattern ‘My favorite sport is __.’

 

Page 12  After I read the heading and main idea, I ask the kids to listen for details about how the author suggests we can be patriotic at school.  When we finish the page, I ask students for the details. Students have had practice with both main idea and details throughout the year in both reading and writing.

 

Page 14  After I read the heading and main idea, I ask the kids to listen for details about how the author suggests people show patriotism in their community.  When we finish the page, I ask students for the details.

 

Page 16  After I read the heading and main idea, I ask the kids to listen for details about what the author tells us about Thomas Jefferson and how he helped our country.  When we finish the page, I ask students for the details.

 

Page 18  After I read the heading and main idea, I ask the kids to listen for details about  citizens’ rights .  When we finish the page, I ask students for the details.

 

Collaborative Conversation

Collaborative conversations are one of the big shifts we see in Common Core.  They are directly addressed in the Common Core Standards and are a focal point across the curriculum. It is important that we start early with these because as students get older and texts get more complex, they will use collaborative conversations to make both meaning from and decisions about what they read.


I have students talk with a partner about how they can be good citizens.   They will use the linguistic patterns: 

How are you a good citizen?  I am a good citizen because __.   

How do you show good citizenship?  I show good citizenship when I ___.

 

I ask for volunteers to share out.  

 

Standard vs. Anchor texts

Common Core delineates 'standard texts' and 'anchor texts.'  Anchor texts are ones that we spend more time on so the kids build the conceptual understandings that support the Big Idea.  The 'standard texts' are generally taught for a shorter period of time.  Multiple reads, as I am doing with Patriotism,  heighten student understanding and allow for more integrated standards to be taught.

Extend Understanding

20 minutes

American Symbols book-supporting and extending the theme of Patriotism

 

I show students our American symbols book.  I turn to the second symbol and read to them about the Shining Star. 

 

Students each get one Shining Star writing paper and put their name on the back.  I do a guided writing with them, as we write what we just read.  I model the writing on my own paper on the document camera so expectations are clear.  Students help me find the sight words on our word wall.  We sound out together to write them.  I prompt them for capitals and end marks, as well. *VIDEO*

 

For example, I say: We know the word ‘the.’  It is on our word wall.  What letter for ‘the?’ (t)  I walk over to the letter ‘T’ on our word wall and we find the word ‘the’ together.  I say:  Let’s write that on our line with a capital T because it is the first word of our sentence.    

 

 

I say:  The next word is ‘United.’  How do we write /u/?  (I write capital U on my paper and students write it on theirs.)  We need to make this U capital because United States is the NAME of our country and we always capitalize NAMES of places, people or things.  We call those ‘proper nouns.’  Everyone say ‘proper noun.’  (students repeat)

 

I say:  How do we write /n/?  (I write ‘n’ on my paper and students write it on theirs) 

 

I say: How do we write /i/?  (I write ‘i’ on my paper and students write it on theirs)

 

I say:  And how do we write /t/?  ( I write ‘t’ on my paper and students write it on theirs)

 

I say:  How do we write /e/?  (I write ‘e’ on my paper and students write it on theirs)

 

I say:  How do we write /d/?  (I write ‘d’ on my paper and students write it on theirs)

 

I then sound out the word slowly to read it U-n-i-t-e-d.  United.   Does everyone have “United” on their first line?  I walk around the room to check that students have the two words written correctly. 

 

I continue on in the same fashion with sight words and sounding out those words the kids can help me with.  In the interest of time, there are some words that I may just model on my paper and the kids copy.  As the students are writing their word/words I monitor the room and assist where necessary.

 

I collect the writing and save it to be glued with the matching art on the next teaching day.

 

Lessons and learnings connect to each other within a lesson and/or throughout a lesson series.  This part of this lesson springboards from the text because the topic of the text is Patriotism.  Almost every picture has an American symbol in it.  This  art will be the picture representation of the  writing page in their book.  The rigor of creating this book is high. It cannot be done in one lesson or one day.  It must be taught in a series.  Also, it requires students to retain learning from day to day!