Second Person Point of View

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Objective

SWBAT identify the point of view of the story teller in text.

Big Idea

When are you part of the story? Students analyze whose eyes the reader is looking through.

Introduction to Second Person Point of View

20 minutes

I begin by having my class to watch a video clip of ▶ If you give a mouse a cookie. I chose this movie because it is an example of a story told mostly in the second person point of view.   We discuss that the second person point of view is written with you being drawn into the story so that you become part of the story. This POV pulls the reader right into the story. You often find this POV in choose your own adventure books or self help books. Although the pronouns "you" and "yours" are often indicators that a story is told in the second person's point of view, the most important indicator is the perspective or voice of the story, and that you become part of the story.  I want to emphasize this so that my students don't get hung up on signal pronouns that might lead them astray.

I show and discuss the Second Person POV Flip Chart with my class to review the major points of our discussion. We discuss to make the connection that the narrator's point of view may be different than that of the characters.  The narrator's point of view has great influence on the way stories or events are told.  We compare/ contrast the difference between first person point of view compared to second person point of view.  Making those distinctions in perspectives and using examples found in literature further distinguishes the different view point of the same story.  I build on their prior knowledge that the same story can be told from different characters' views such as the different versions of The Three Little Pig. This lesson makes even deeper analysis for determination of whose perspective the story is told for less obvious texts.

Because my students are high level readers, I decided that it is important they know how to distinguish POVs, including first, second, and third person. My students will encounter complex POVs in the higher level texts that they will read, so it makes sense to amp up teaching this standard for when they encounter the complexities of POV in their higher level texts. In fact, Common Core Standards usually addresses this concept in fourth grade, and many of my high achieving and gifted students are reading at fourth grade or higher levels.

Finding Examples

20 minutes

I show another video to my class from a book entitled: â–¶ If you take a mouse to school by Laura Numeroff and Felicia Bond.  I distribute a Second Person POV Graphic Organizer for students to write their thoughts and reasons why they know it is written from the second person's point of view. 

Like a second reading, we watch the video a second time for students to take notes and cite examples from the video. I ask students to pair with another students and discuss their findings.  They share their evidence proving that the sample story is from the second person perspective. I ask students to create a Trifold Manual that summarizes the second person point of view by giving a definition, example, and tips of how to identify the second person point of view. The second POV manual students create serves as a guide to finding more examples of second person POV in literature.

Using the trifold manual as a guide, students select a book from the library that exemplifies the second person point of view.  I distribute a Second Person POV Graphic Organizer for students to write their thoughts and reason why their selection is written from the second person's point of view. Most second person point of views are Procedural texts. Second person point of view is the least common in literature.  Therefore, I recommend researching examples from both digital and text sources that exemplify this perspective before you teach this lesson.

Sharing Our Discovery

20 minutes

Students share their second person POV citations and explanations with the class.  Using a rubric for self-assessment, students rate their performance on Citing Text Evidence that effectively shows that the story is told from the second person point of view.   We talk about procedural texts such as recipes and assembly directions since these are the most common real world examples of second person point of view.  Citing evidence from text and real world applications are the important elements for teaching common core.