"Self-Reliance" and Figurative Language Practice, Day Two

3 teachers like this lesson
Print Lesson

Objective

Students will be able to identify and analyze figurative language by reading and analyzing Emerson's "Self-Reliance."

Big Idea

Metaphor, simile, hyperbole, oh my! Identifying and analyzing figurative language.

Do Now: Personification Skit

10 minutes

Since students struggled with the difference between metaphor and personification during a previous lesson, I focus on personification today (metaphor was a focus during our last warm-up). I ask students to create a brief skit personifying something in the classroom. Their classmates will guess what they are.

From the stapler ("I must get these papers together, I must!") to the chairs ("You weigh a ton."), these skits are an amusing start to the hour which, I hope, better illustrates how personification works.

Emerson's "Self-Reliance"

25 minutes

We continue our reading using the same read-write-share strategy referenced here. As on our previous day, we only work with a few paragraphs, moving slowly to avoid frustration. Students again struggle with vocabulary, but our rounds of discussion help us achieve understanding. I see students scribbling extra notes in their text margins, a good strategy which will help them in future analysis.

Figurative Language Practice

10 minutes

Today, I again provide a single quote from our reading for students to analyze. I project it on the board as follows:

"For nonconformity the world whips you with its displeasure" (Emerson, 1841).

  1. What figurative language is used?
  2. What does the quote mean?
  3. How does the figurative language impact tone?

I ask students to analyze the quote with a partner again since we have not yet successfully analyzed a quote; until they have success with partner support, we cannot move on to independent practice. To do so would be faulty gradual release/scaffolding.

Because we are so close to the end of the hour, today's practice is an exit ticket; students must submit it as they leave the room.