Identifying Tens and Ones

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Objective

Students will be able to understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; using dimes and pennies.

Big Idea

Students will be given set amount of money to add, and identify how many tens and ones.

To Begin

20 minutes

I start this lesson by writing 61 cents on the board. I call on the student of the day to use dimes and pennies to make 61 cents and to illustrate their solution on the board.  After that,  I ask students to tell me how many dimes did we use? How many pennies did we use? Students count 6 dimes and 1 penny.

To see just how much my students know about this concept, I ask can we make 61 cents another way.  Some students say two quarters, 1 dime, and 1 penny.  I get various other correct responses and decide to move forward with the lesson.

Allowing the students to explain how and why shows how much they already know about counting coins.

I ask students which digit in the number 61 tells us the number of dimes to use? (6) Which digit in the number 61 tells us the number of pennies to use? (1)

I want students to be able to count coins, as well as know the value of the coin they are counting. Seeing students attacking this skill several times only asking questions when they appear to be stuck, really reveals a high-level of understanding so far.

MP1 - Make sense of problems & persevere in solving them.

Working in Groups

20 minutes

I ask students to move to their assigned groups.  

I ask each group to pick up the card that has been placed on their table.  The cards display different amounts of money.  I ask students to work together to illustrate and explain how many dimes and pennies it takes to make the amount of money shown.  After each group agrees on the total amount of dimes and pennies it takes to make the correct amount, I ask them to write the amount on the chart MP6-Model with mathematics.

After they have identified the correct amount, I ask students to discuss how they got their answers. Some students discuss that they group the dimes together and count by tens, and the ones together and count by ones.

As students are working I circle the room and ask questions to help them better understand the concept of this lesson.  I ask students to tell me the number of pennies they had.  I also ask them to tell me how much pennies are worth. I ask students to explain how much the digits are worth, what the digit on the left will tell us, how many tens and ones are needed to make their given amount. As students respond, I write down concerns to address throughout the remainder of this lesson.

Showing your Work

20 minutes

I ask students to return to their original seats.  I tell them since they have done such a wonderful job explaining how many dimes/pennies it takes to make each given amount, that I think they're ready to explain how many tens and ones are in the given set of numbers. 

I distribute their practice sheet. Then I read and explain the directions. I want to make sure they understand what they need to do in order to be successful.

Early in the lesson I noticed some students were having trouble, so I decide to write an example on the board to assist them in learning how to identify tens and ones.

"How many tens and ones are in 93 cents?" (9 tens and 3 ones)

I explain the position of the 9 and the 3, and how this effects the value of the digits. "The 9 is in the tens place so there are 9 tens. Who can tell me what place the 3 is in?" (It is in the ones place, so we have 3 ones) "Right!"

As students are working I circle the room to check for understanding. I want to know if students have mastered the intended outcome (Identifying tens and ones).  I ask students which digit tells us the number of dimes/pennies. Students know that the value of the number in the tens place can be counted by tens, just like the value of the number in the ones place can be counted by ones.  How many tens would it take to make 93 and how many ones would it take to make 93?  Some students counted and some students compared the given question to work they have already done. 

I allow students to share what they have learned! I encourage students to take notes and to ask questions.