Action Verbs and Linking Verbs

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Objective

SWBAT identify and use action verbs and linking verbs correctly in sentences.

Big Idea

Students will learn how to identify and use action and linking verbs correctly in sentences.

Narrative

1 minutes

Introduction

14 minutes

I begin the lesson by throwing a ball to one of my students.  I explain that throw is an action verb. It tells what the subject of a sentence does.  "I throw the ball." I ask students to think-pair-share an action verb with their tablemates and use it correctly in a sentence.  We, then, go around the room and share the action verbs as a whole group.  Next, I sit down in a chair and say, " I am sitting in the chair."  I write on the board and explain words such as "am, is, are, was, become, seem, and appear" tell what the subject is or is like in a sentence.  These words are called linking verbs.  Linking verbs are often forms of the verb "to be."  I ask students to think-pair-share a linking verb with their tablemates and use it correctly in a sentence.  We go around the room and share student responses as a whole group.  I write on the board and explain linking verbs because I have found them to be more challenging for students to comprehend than action verbs.

Action and Linking Verb Bee

30 minutes

Next, we play a game - an Action and Linking Verb Bee.  Students line up across the front of the room.  I ask each of them to say an action verb, spell it, and use it correctly in a sentence as I display the action verb prompt on the SmartBoard (see attached resource).  If a student misses any component, they are out of the game and must sit down.  Students may not repeat the same action verb as another student has already said.  Then, we move to linking verbs.  Students must say a linking verb, spell it, and use it correctly in a sentence as I display the linking verb prompt on the SmartBoard (see attached resource).  Since there are fewer linking verbs than action verbs in the English language, students may not repeat the same linking verb as the person that answered immediately before them.  The last student standing is the winner and receives a small treat!  The use of the Action and Linking Verb Bee is a unique instructional strategy that is aligned to CCSS in that it allows my scholars the opportunity to explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion, as well as identify the evidence to support a particular point relative to speaking and listening standards.  Additionally, the activity is aligned to CCSS language standards in that my scholars demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when speaking. 

Closure

15 minutes

To close the lesson, I give students two minutes to write the definition of an action verb and three minutes to list as many action words as they can.  I then give students two minutes to write the definition of a linking verb and three minutes to list as many linking verbs as they can.  Afterwards, we share definitions and some examples of each whole group.