How to Identify and Use Singular and Plural Nouns

4 teachers like this lesson
Print Lesson

Objective

SWBAT identify and use correctly singular and plural nouns in sentences.

Big Idea

Students will play a game to identify and use singular and plural nouns correctly in sentences.

Narrative

1 minutes

Introduction

4 minutes

I refresh students' memories from the previous lesson on common nouns and proper nouns by again playing the short Brainpop video on nouns because it also explains singular and plural nouns.  (We don't take the quiz today.) (Click here to watch video.) I explain singular nouns name a single or 1 person, place, or thing -  for example, boy, girl, chair, book, school, goose.  I explain plural nouns name more than 1 person, place, thing, or idea. I give students an opportunity to share singular nouns they think of.  Examples of plural nouns are boys, girls, chairs, books, schools.  I write these examples on the board and explain that with most plural nouns you just add "s" to the singular form to make it plural.  I give students an opportunity to share plural nouns they think of.  However, there are some irregular plural nouns, as well (i.e, children, women, men, geese).  I further explain that there are a few nouns that are the same word for the singular and plural forms of the word (i.e., deer, moose). I write the words on the board to reach my visual learners. I say the words and have the students repeat them to reach my auditory learners. Providing examples gives students insight into my thinking.  Allowing them to provide examples gives me an opportunity to provide immediate feedback to them and correct any errors or misconceptions.

Singular and Plural Noun Bee

20 minutes

Next, I have students to line up across the front of the room and we have a singular and plural noun bee. I begin by again telling students the definition of a singular noun.  All students line up across the front of the room. I ask them to think of a singular noun and display the singular noun prompt on the SmartBoard.  Each student says a singular noun.  If they say a word that is not a singular noun, they are out of the bee and must sit down.  Next round, I again explain to them what a plural noun is.  I ask them to think of a plural noun and display the plural noun prompt on the SmartBoard.  Each student, then says a plural noun.  If they say a word that is not a plural noun, they are out of the bee and must sit down.  For subsequent rounds, I make the game more rigorous by asking them to name a person that is a singular noun, a people that are plural nouns, a place that is  a singular noun, places that are plural noun, a thing that is a singular noun, and things that are a plural nouns.  The last student standing is the winner and receives a small treat!

Game

20 minutes

For the next portion of the lesson, students again line up across the front of the room.  But, this time they have use singular or plural nouns in correctly in a sentence, and the next student has to identify the singular or plural noun(s) stated by the previous student in their sentence.

Example:

I say singular noun and display the singular noun prompt on the SmartBoard.

1st student says - I like going to school.

2nd student says - singular noun is school.

I say plural noun and display the plural noun prompt on the SmartBoard.

3rd student says - My sisters and brothers like to play outside.

4th student says - plural nouns are sisters and brothers.

The last student standing receives a small treat!

Closure

15 minutes

To close the lesson, students write a short narrative paragraph in which they use and underline 3 singular nouns and 3 plural nouns.  I have found that a culminating writing activity is an excellent way to assess my students' knowledge and understanding of singular and plural nouns.  Not only am I able to see if they can identify singular and plural nouns, but I am also able to assess whether they can use singular and plural nouns correctly in context.