Letters in a Name

6 teachers like this lesson
Print Lesson

Objective

Students will be able to recognize that spoken words are represented in written language by a specific sequence of letters.

Big Idea

Using their names helps students recognize the importance of putting letters in the correct sequence.

INTRODUCTION

15 minutes

Gather students on the rug using a preferred classroom management technique. I like to use my “Stop, look, listen.” The students stop what they are doing, look at me and listen for the direction. I usually preface the direction with, “When I say go…” This reminds the students to listen to the whole direction before moving to follow the directive.

In this case I would say, “When I say go I would like you to clear your space, push in your chair and go take a spot on your dot. Walking feet go.” By saying walking feet I am reminding the students to use walking feet in the classroom to ensure safe movement between areas.

Once I have all of the students on the rug I sing the BINGO song with them. I like this version from Super Simple Songs because it has different actions for the students to do. You could play it on the SMARTBoard while the students were singing with you or just memorize the song and do it yourself with the students.

 

BINGO song with different actions 

 

When the song is over I have the students take a spot on their dot on the rug. I ask the students to raise their hand if they can tell me the letters which made up the name in the song we just sang.

I tell the students that I am now going to read them a story. 

ACTIVITY

40 minutes

I show the students the cover of the book we are about to read. “This book is called My Name is Yoon. The book is written by Helen Recorvits. She wrote the words so she is the author. Gabi Swaitkowska drew the pictures so she is the illustrator.”

I tell the students that the cover of the book can sometimes be used as a clue as to what the book is about. I model this process. “When I look at the cover of this book I see a little girl writing and since the title is called My Name is Yoon, I am predicting that this book is about a little girl who writes her name. Do you think that is a good prediction?”

Somebody may raise their hand and ask what a prediction is so I tell the students, “A prediction is a really good guess based on what I observe or know.”

Now I read the story to the students.

While I am reading the book I use thinking aloud to draw attention to the focus of our lesson. “Wow, Yoon is right. Korean writing does look pretty, and it does not look anything like the letters we use to make up our words.”

When I get to the page where Yoon is displaying her name for all to see I ask the students what kind of letters she used to make her name? There may be a student or two that notices she used all upper case letters and I will make a brief mention about how only the first letter of our name is supposed to be an upper case letter.

After the story is finished I let the students know that they will be making their own name today. I let the students know they will each be getting an envelope which has the letters of their name in it. It will be their job to take the letters out and put them in the correct order to make their name. I let the students know that they are allowed to use the many resources around the classroom to check to see if they have the letters in the correct order.

Students working

I let the student know once they have the letters in order they will be gluing them to a strip of paper. Then they will glue on a picture of their face and the handprint we made using the flesh colored markers from earlier in the day.

I model the process for my visual learners and my student who has auditory processing disorder.

When my demonstration is over I let the students know they will have 20 minutes to complete the assigned task. I set the visual timer for them to see.  

Now I dismiss the students to work stations one group at a time to maintain a safe and orderly classroom. 

CLOSURE

15 minutes

When the time limit is up I use my “Stop, look, listen” classroom management technique to gain the students attention. The students stop what they are doing, look at me and listen for the direction. I usually preface the direction with, “When I say go…” This reminds the students to listen to the whole direction before moving to follow the directive.

In this case I would say, “When I say go I would like you to clear your space, push in your chair and go take a spot on your dot. Walking feet go.” By saying walking feet I am reminding the students to use walking feet in the classroom to ensure safe movement between areas.

Once I have all of the students sitting on the rug I tell the students that we are going to share our work with the rest of our group. I let the students know that when it is their turn they can tell us the letters that make up their name and also tell us if they used a resource to get the order of the letters right. If they did use a resource could they please tell us which resource they used and how it helped?

Once everyone has had a chance to share I tell the students that they will be dismissed using the fair sticks to put their work away, use hand sanitizer and get their snack. 

Student display board 

ASSESSMENT

5 minutes

I call the students over to see me one at a time during a busy time such as integrated work stations or free choice center time.

I show the student a pile of blue and red magnetic letters. The blue are the consonants and the red are vowels (the reason I do this is because the students nametags for the tables are labeled using blue and red sharpie markers). Within the piles there are upper and lower case letters. I am also observing for if the student knows to start his or her name with an upper case letter and I will ask the student, “Why did you choose that letter for the beginning of your name?” The student may or may not be able to tell me.

I ask the student to select the correct letters to make up his or her name for me.

I take a photo of the resulting work to cut and paste on the Name Assessment Checklist I have made. Once I have cut and paste the photo onto the assessment checklist I place a copy of it in the student’s portfolio.  

EXTENTIONS

We play “Name Memory.” For this game I make three sets of cards relating to the students. The first set is individual student pictures with their name on it. The second set is just their picture and the third set is just the name. I back each set with a different color of cardstock and laminate for durability. We play "Memory" with the cards.

The first time we play the game I play with the set of cards with the student picture and name and the set with just their picture. The students turn over one yellow card (let us say the first set is backed with yellow) and then one orange card (let us say the second set is backed with orange). If the two pictures match then the student can see the name which relates to the picture and they get to hold onto that matching set. The next student turns over a yellow card and an orange card. If the cards do not match the student must turn the two cards back over and it is the next players turn.

The next day we will play with the cards that have the students picture and name and the set that has just the name. Now the students must match the picture/name card with a name card. This gives the students a chance to relate to their peers names.

The next day we play with name cards and the cards with just the student picture. This is the trickiest day. Students really have to relate to the name. This can also be tricky when you have more than one student with the same name. We usually differentiate by adding the first initial of the last name.

Students playing memory  

 

Another activity I have available is where the student’s make their name and their peers name using magnetic letters. When the students first do this activity I have their picture attached to their name on a sentence strip. The students use the magnetic letters to build the name. The next time we do this activity I would only have the students’ pictures. Now I encourage the students to use the resources around the classroom to build the selected student’s name. For example, the desk nametags, the word wall, or the lunch sticks, etc. Inviting the students to use the resources around the classroom allows them to experience getting information from a different source rather than having the information provided for you.

Students using magnetic letters to make their names

 

Another activity I have available for the students is where they use clothes pegs to make their names. When the students first do this activity I have their picture attached to their name on a sentence strip. The students use the clothes pegs to build the name. The next time we do this activity I would only have the students’ pictures. Now I encourage the students to use the resources around the classroom to build the selected student’s name. For example, the desk nametags, the word wall, or the lunch sticks, etc. Inviting the students to use the resources around the classroom allows them to experience getting information from a different source rather than having the information provided for you.  

Students making names with clothes pegs