Finding Simple Subjects and Simple Predicates

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Objective

SWBAT determine the simple subject and simple predicate of given sentences while playing a Who Wants to be a Millionaire-inspired online game.

Big Idea

Students will learn to identify the simple subject and simple predicate of sentences while playing a Who Wants to be a Millionaire-inspired online game.

Narrative

1 minutes

Introduction

9 minutes

Scholars need to understand how to identify the simple subject and simple predicate when reading and when constructing sentences.  In this lesson, students will do just that!  I began by explaining to them that the complete subject tells whom or what a sentence is about.  The simple subject is the most important word in the complete subject.  The simple subject is either a noun or a pronoun.  Another word for the simple predicate is "verb."  The predicate or verb tells what the subject is or does.  Given the sentence - The famous ruler formed a huge army. The complete subject is "the famous ruler."  The simple subject or most important word in the complete subject is just "ruler."  The predicate or verb is just the word "formed."   With imperative sentences like - Sit at the front of the class.  The simple subject is implied "you." and the simple predicate is "sit."

Next, we watched a short Brainpop video on subject and predicate and took the short quiz afterwards.  (Click here to watch video.) (Teacher will discuss quiz whole group and scholars will respond using sign language, showing a,b,c, or d as their answer choices or write on a personal dry erase board.  I like this method of checking for understanding because it allows me to see how each and every student is responding.)

After the video, students worked in pairs to construct their own sentences and have their partner identify the simple subject and simple predicate.  (Teacher walks around to monitor and check for understanding.)  Students justified their answers as to why they selected particular words as either the simple subject or simple predicate.  This is a key shift in Common Core-aligned lessons because it requires students to cite evidence. 

Game

45 minutes

Now, I divide my scholars into 2 teams in order to play a Who Wants to be a Millionaire-inspired game!  The winning team will receive treats!  (Click here to play game.)  I have found grammar games, especially those which use technological resources, engage students so they are learning as they are playing.  Use of games infuses cooperation and competition into lessons.  They allow students to collaborate and create bonding experiences between students and the teacher.

Closure

5 minutes

To close the lesson, scholars will do a ticket-out-the door and tell me the definition of a simple subject and a simple predicate.  Then, each student will write a sentence of their own and identify the simple subject and simple predicate.  This is a quick check for understanding and will guide my instruction in future lessons for which students will require reinforcement and which will require remediation.