We've got our fingers on it!: Referring Explicitly to the Text to Recount Folktales

10 teachers like this lesson
Print Lesson

Objective

SWBAT identify evidence in the text to answer questions.

Big Idea

As students gain more comfort with the genre of folktales, students will delve into referring explicitly to the text to find evidence to support their inferences when recounting folktale components.

Enroll Students Into Learning

5 minutes

Now that we've finished watching the folktale, I remind the students of the chant we learned in the previous lesson.  I ask the students to do the chant with me again as a review (see my lesson entitled, “Folktale, folktale… chant, chant, chant!” for details on the chant).  While doing the chant (the part that names the five pieces), the students name the different components of the folktale we just watched.

Experience Learning

10 minutes

Now that we've finished watching the folktale, I remind the students of the chant we learned in the previous lesson.  I ask the students to do the chant with me again as a review (see my lesson entitled, “Folktale, folktale… chant, chant, chant!” for details on the chant).  While doing the chant (the part that names the five pieces), the students name the different components of the folktale we just watched.

Label Students' New Learning

5 minutes

When students are finished with the chant, I say something like, “Boys and girls!  I’m so proud of you!  Each of you know how to recount a folktale!  This is amazing!”

Demonstrate Skills and Assessment

10 minutes

Next, I tell the students that since they’re so smart and can find all the parts of a folktale, we’re going to work on proving how they know the parts.  I explain that we’re going to work in partners today on making notes about folktale components referring explicitly to the story.  I share a copy of the text from the folktale we watched together with each of the kids. 

I also show the kids how to complete a “Double Flipchart”.  The “Double Flipchart” has the students write about each of the components of the folktale, and then asks the students to “prove it” by explaining how they know from the text.  (See the "Double Flipchart" template in the "Resources" section here!)  I model for the kids how to create a “Double Flipchart” and how to complete one on a folktale that we’ve already read together, such as Tops & Bottoms retold by Janet Stevens.  I remind the students that we can almost put our fingers on the parts of the text that help us identify each of the components!  Once students can help me fill in the components, I let them begin to work with their partners on the current folktale. 

As students are working, I circulate and help guide any student misconceptions.  This talking time is a perfect time to find any students who still need support and guide their thinking so that they are able to work independently soon!  But mostly, the work is not done by me in this lesson-students are working toward independence!

Review

5 minutes

When students are finished with their flipcharts, I allow them to share with the class what they decided on for the components of their “Folktale Double Flipchart”.  (You can see a sample of one of my students finished "Folktale Double Flipcharts" below in the "Resources" section!)