What's Your Value?

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Objective

Students will be able to write the value of numbers according to their place value.

Big Idea

The value of a number is determined by place value. Each place is 10 times greater than the number place to its right.

Do Now

5 minutes

When the students enter the classroom, they should take a 6-digit number from a basket and write the number on the place value chart on their desk.  They will use this information for the group activity.

Note:  To encourage group interaction with different students, write a letter on the back of each number.  Since the students will be working in groups, make sure that you write the same numbers 3 times so that 3 different students will have the same number.  For example, the number 124,892 would be written on 3 pieces of paper and have the letter "A" on the back of the paper.  When you put the students in groups, let all the students with the letter "A" come to the same group.  Put the letter "B" on the back of another number, etc.

Motivation

10 minutes

Ask the students a question to catch their attention.  For example, "Who would like to win a hundred thousand?"  Most students will raise their hand, but I'm not sure if they are thinking $100 or $100,000.  To keep their interest about the prize, I do not share with them that the prize is a Hundred Grand candy bar until the end of the lesson.  To get a better understanding of how the students are thinking, I follow that question with another question, such as, "What does a hundred thousand people look like?"  How much bigger is a group of 100,000 people compared to a group of 100 people?  Give the students a few minutes to discuss with a partner their thoughts about a hundred thousand people.  Let a few students share their responses.  I tell the students, "Today, we will discuss place value.  By the end of the lesson, you will know the value of numbers to the hundred thousands place."

This lesson aligns with 4.NBT.A1 because the students will recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place represents ten times what it represents in the place to its right.

Direct Instruction

10 minutes

To begin the lesson, I call the students to the carpet.  I find that the students pay more attention while I'm at the Smart board if they are near me.  I begin by sharing a video lesson at the following site:

http://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/math/numbers/place-value.htm

After the video, we use a place value chart to practice the skill before they go to their seats to work in groups. 

Practice:

Together with the students, we write 12,159 in expanded form. First, we write the value of each number on the place value chart.  

 

Hundred Thousands

Ten Thousands

Thousands

Hundreds

Tens

Ones

 

 1

 0

 0

 0

 0

 

 

 2

 0

 0

 

 

 

 1

 0

 0

 

 

 

 

 5

 0

 

 

 

 

 

 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Then take those values and write them in expanded form.

10,000 + 2,000 + 100 + 50 + 9

After we write the expanded form, I have a discussion with the students about the number in the ten thousands place and the hundreds place.  They are both 1's.  We discuss, the fact that if we were discussing money, the person with $10,000 would have $9,900 more.  I feel that when we relate numbers to money, the students get a better understand because they know a lot about money.  The rationale behind this discussion is to give the students a visual of how numbers are in place value and how those values differ from each other.  

 

 

Group Activity/Exploration

30 minutes

Put the students in groups of 3. Give the students the Place Value Group Activity Sheet and a Place Value Chart to the Hundred Thousands.  Using the place value chart (MP5), the students should work together to write the expanded form of each number. The students should discuss and agree upon the expanded form (MP3).  They should make a plan and carry out that plan to solve the problem (MP1).  After they have the expanded form correct, the students should take money and display the correct amount for each place value.  The teacher should walk around to ask the students questions that lead to the big idea outlined for the lesson.  Sample questions are outlined below.

Assessing Questions:   

1.  What can you tell me about the places on the place value chart?

2.  How do you know the value of the number in the hundreds place?

3.  Which place is bigger, the hundreds place or the thousands place?  How do you know?

4. How much bigger is the tens place than the ones place?  

5.  What can you multiply by one to get 10?

6.  What can you multiply by 10 to get 100?

7.  What can you multiply by 100 to get 1,000?

8.  What pattern do you notice?

After the students finish their group activity, bring the class back together for a whole class discussion.  This is another opportunity to ask assessing questions to the class.  Make sure that all students understand that each place is 10 times greater than the place to the right.  Also, the students should be able to give the value of the numbers on their place value chart. In this Video - Place Value, I discuss the student work.

If any groups finish the assignment early, they can practice the skill at the following website:  http://www.math-play.com/football-math-place-value-game/football-math-place-value.html


 

Materials:  Place Value Chart, Activity Sheet, Money


Independent Activity

10 minutes

The Independent Activity Place Value sheet is displayed on the Smart board.

I have the students write their own number to the hundred thousands place.  The students should write the number on the place value chart.  The students should write the expanded form of the number.  Then they should use money to represent each place value.  I have the students fill in the following blank:  Each place value is ____ times greater than the place to the right.  Each student that has the correct expanded form and understands that each place is 10 times greater than the place to the right wins a "100 Grand" candy bar.

Homework

5 minutes

Students should take a homework sheet as they exit the classroom. The homework will be discussed the next day in class.