Lesson: The Mix-Match Problem-Finding the Author's Main Idea

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Lesson Objective

Students will know and be able to explain the differences between what is important to them and what is important to the author.

Lesson Plan

 

 

State Standard:

5.IT-E.1. Identify the author’s purpose and summarize the critical details of expository text, maintaining chronological or logical order.

Objective

 

 

 

Students will know and be able to explain the differences between what is important to them and what is important to the author.

 

Do Now

What is author’s purpose? How do you determine author’s purpose?

 

Hook

How many times have a you taken a test and they ask the question that starts with “The main idea of______is__? or What is the author’s purpose? How many times have you gotten that question wrong, when you are certain you had the right answer?

 

Direct Instruction

T: Good readers often read a text and take away from it what is important to them. This is great and what author’s ultimately want you to do. However, sometimes there is a disconnect between what the reader thinks is important and what the writer most wants us to learn from the article. Sometimes the reader and the author are on the same page. Thinking the same thing. Sometimes we mix-match our purpose for reading, with the authors purpose for writing. The mix-match might happen because of our personal connections, reading style, etc.

 

Of course, there is nothing more important than your thinking about what you are reading. But we also have to remember that the writer has an important purpose in mind.  We have to think about what that purpose is. This is especially useful when we are taking a test that ask us about main idea or author’s purpose. 

 

Today, we are going to learn a strategy to help us focus in on what the author thinks is most important. Let’s read this article called” Haiti Picks Up the Pieces” (http://www.timeforkids.com/TFK/teachers/wr/article/0,27972,1956443,00.html).

 

I am going to draw a T-chart on this chart paper. One side will say, “What I Learned/Thinking” the other side say’s “What the Author wants me to learn/remember. 

 

Model your strategy use. 

 

Guided Practice

Model and allow students to practice using the shared article. Then write a summary of the main idea from the author’s perspective.

 

 

Independent Practice

 Give students an article (you can scaffold by choosing articles from www.scholasticnews.com or www.timeforkids.com). 

 

Students will create their own T-chart in their reader’s notebook and write a summary of the main idea from the author’s perspective.

 

Closing

Discuss how this strategy might be helpful and when it is a good idea to use it.

 

Quiz/Assessment

Assess students summaries.

 

Lesson Resources

Haiti Article
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Time For Kids
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T-Chart with Lines
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T-Chart No Lines
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