Lesson: Using Turning Point to determine moral/theme

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Lesson Objective

Students will know and be able to identify the moral of the story by finding the most important part (turning point) in a story. They will support their assertions using evidence from the text.

Lesson Plan

 

 

State Standard:

5.LT-T.3. Identify the theme (moral, lesson, meaning, message, view or comment on life) of a literary selection.

Objective

 

 

 

Students will know and be able to identify the moral of the story by finding the most important part (turning point) in a story. They will support their assertions using evidence from the text.

Do Now

In your journal respond to the following quote. Remember to write your first thoughts and what you think this quote means. 

“Its often easier to fight for principles than to live up to them”-Adlai Stevenson

Hook

Write the following words on the board:  failure, success, teacher, determined, perseverance, knowledge and power. Ask students to discuss each word, what they mean to them. Tell them to think about these words as we read today.

Direct Instruction

 

Text: THank You, Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco

You will need to preview the text and scaffold the introduction to the text based on your student’s need. This includes vocabulary.

T :  “Today we will read the story, “Thank you, Mr. Falker” Looking at the cover and the title let’s make predictions about the text.  Today we are going to think about what the author wants us to learn from this story, the moral of the story. Whenever we read a text we should think about what the author wants us to learn and understand from the story.  When  good readers  think about the moral of the story they focus in on the turning point, or most important part of the story. Usually this is the part when the character experiences a change. This change usually gives us a clue about the moral of the story.  As we read this story, think about what’s the most important part of the story. We will use evidence from the text and be able to explain why we believe it is the most important part of the story.

 

 

Create an anchor chart.

 

Read through p. 3.

 

Say: hmm. this seems like it could be important because the author is already starting to identify the problem in the story. The evidence from the text suggest Trisha had trouble reading and felt dumb. That’s pretty important. I’m not sure if its the most important so let’s read on.

 

Readers did you see how I paid attention to the emotional points in the story. The clues from the text, my own connections and my inferences helped me answer the question: Is this a turning point.

 

Guided Practice

Continue reading. Stop several times at pg. 8, 10, 13,16, 20. Have students turn and talk and answer the question “is this a turning point?”. They must support their assertions with evidence from the text. Add ideas to anchor chart. As a class examine the turning points and decide on the moral of the story. Write the moral of the story in 1-2 sentences. 

 

Independent Practice

Have students choose one moment from the that they felt was the MOST important point from the story and support their assertions from the text. Have them discuss if their turning point supports the moral of the story. Then allow students time to apply strategy to independent text as you monitor.

 

Closing

Review word meaning and strategy use. Have one student who used the strategy share how it helped them. Have students discuss when they would use the strategy. Add it to the anchor chart. Then have students practice use of the strategy during their independent reading time.

 

Quiz/Assessment

 

http://www.doe.mass.edu/mcas/2008/release/g5ela.pdf

Read and answer questions from the Black Pearl

 

BCR Style: What is the moral or theme in this story? Use the text to justify your answer. 

 

Lesson Resources

MCAS Released Items 2008
1995

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