Lesson: Properties lesson 14

309 Views
4 Downloads
0 Favorites

Lesson Objective

How do mathematicians name equal parts of a group?

Lesson Plan

Edward Brooke Charter School

I.                   Curriculum Standards

 

Identify and represent common fractions (unit fractions up through 1/12) as parts of wholes, parts of groups.  Place halves and quarters on the number line. [M.2.8]

 

 

 

 

 

 

II.                    The Point

 

How do mathematicians name equal parts of a group?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 III.                Materials Needed

 

      Copies of 2.10.14 Problem Solving Task

      Optional: Enlarged Problem Solving Task

      Counters

      Math Journals/ Glue Sticks

 

 

 

 

 

 

IV.                 Lesson Outline

 

     Time:  60 Minutes

 

                          5 min. – Understanding the point and the problem-solving task

                          5 min. – Independent problem-solving

                        25 min. – Whole-Class Discussion/Practice/ Summary

     15 min. – Slate Math

     10 min. – Flexible: Mental Math/ Organizing and Interpreting Data

 

                                                                           

 

 

  V.             Learning Activities

 

 

1.   Understanding “the point” and the problem-solving task (5 min.)

 

      Distribute a Problem Solving Task slip to each student. 

 

Students try to read and understand the task independently. 

 

 

 

       2.  Independent problem-solving (10 min.)

 

            Students record their answers on slates.   

 

 

 

3.  Whole-Class Discussion/Practice/Summary (30 min.)

 

 

PART I – Whole-Class Discussion

                       

 

The Big Ideas:

 

 

ü  Mathematicians use the same notation to write fractions that name equal parts of a group (collection of objects.)

 

 
 

The top number (numerator) shows how many things we are talking about.

 

 

 

                                                           

                              1

 
 

The line shows a cut.  We are cutting/dividing the whole group into equal shares/ amounts.

 

 

 

                                          

 

The bottom number (denominator) shows how many equal shares/amounts the whole group/ collection is cut into.

 

               2

     

 

 

 

ü  A fraction always represents a fractional part of a whole.

 

 

 

ü  In today’s lesson, the whole is a group of things – a collection of pennies.

 

ü  Fractional parts have names that tell how many parts of that size are needed to make the whole.  (Thirds require three parts of that size/amount to make a whole.)

 

 

Possible Discussion:

 

  • Students share and discuss their responses to the problem.

 

  • Some students may notice that three sixths can also be described as half of the pennies.  It is less likely, but possible that a student will suggest calling two sixths 1/3 of the whole set.  (You might choose to add this option to column 2 on the classroom display – “Each person will get  of the pennies.”

 

  • After students discuss Part a and Part b for each of the three examples, ask the question in the third column of the sample classroom display, “What is ___ of ____?” 

 

  • How is the whole in today’s task different from the whole in the past two tasks?  (the strips of paper and the pie)

      [the pennies are a group of things rather than 1 object/shape.]

 

  • We can divide up objects into equal groups in order to share them equally.

 

To share the set of pennies between 3 people, we had to group them into 3 equal groups.  Each group has 2 pennies. 

 

Therefore, we can say:

 

Each person gets 2 pennies.

 

Each person gets two sixths of the pennies.

 

Each person gets of the pennies (1 out of 3 equal groups.)

 

 

 

 

 

The Point:  How do mathematicians name equal parts of a group?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                              

 

 

 

                

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                    

                     PART II - PRACTICE

 

 

                          Display various quantities of counters on the board or overhead. 

 

                          Ask students to identify and represent fractional shares of counters.  

 

 

                          Examples:

 

 

 

                          Place 9 red counters and 3 blue counters on your desk.        

 

                                        

 

                       
   
             
               
 
 

 

 

 

 

                                What fraction of the counters are red?

 

                                What fraction of the counters are blue?

 

 

 

 

                          Now place 12 counters that are all the same color on your desk. 

 

                                    If 3 people divide up the counters equally/fairly, how many will                        each person get?   What fraction describes their share?

 

                                    If 4 people divide up the counters equally/fairly, how many will                         each person get?   What fraction describes their share?

 

                                    If 6 people divide up the counters equally/fairly, how many will                         each person get?   What fraction describes their share?

 

                                    If 2 people divide up the counters equally/fairly, how many will                         each person get?   What fraction describes their share?

 

                                    If 12 people divide up the counters equally/fairly, how many will                      each person get?   What fraction describes their share?

 

 

 

 

 

                        PART III – SUMMARY

 

 

 

ü  Stop and have students look back at the question that is The Point of today’s lesson. 

                       

                 How do mathematicians name equal parts of a group?

 

ü  Students work together with teacher to compose a statement that answers The Point’s question. 

 

 

 

 

 

4.    Slate Math (15 min.)

 

                        Plan slate math based on student needs.

 

 

 

 

 

5.    Mental Math/Data (10 min.)

 

  Students participate in a Mental Math or Data Collecting/Interpreting                session.  

 

 

Lesson Resources

2.10.14.doc  
36
2.10.14 Problem Solving Task.doc  
53
2.10.14 Enlarged Task.doc  
52

Close

 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close