Lesson: Place Value lesson 1

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Lesson Objective

How do mathematicians write 10 ten thousands? What do mathematicians call 10 ten thousands? [Teacher’s Note: Today’s lesson introduces the hundred-thousands place.]

Lesson Plan

Edward Brooke Charter School

 

I.                   Curriculum Standards

 

ü Count by 3 to 30 and 4 to 40, starting at any multiple of 3 or 4.   [M.1.2.a]

ü Count by 100 and 1000, starting at any number to a million. [M.1.2.b]

ü Identify place value of digits up to a million. [M.2.2.a]

ü Write numbers in basic expanded form (e.g., 6091 = 6000 + 90 + 1). [M.2.2.b]

ü Demonstrates an understanding of the values of digits up to a million (e.g., that in 21,054, the 1 represents 1,000). [M.2.2.c]

 

 

II.                    The Point

 

How do mathematicians write 10 ten thousands?

What do mathematicians call 10 ten thousands?

 

                          [Teacher’s Note: Today’s lesson introduces the hundred-thousands   place.]

 

 

 III.                Materials Needed

 

      Copies of 2.9.1 Problem Solving Task

      Optional: Enlarged Problem Solving Task

      Copies of 2.9.1 Place Value Table (Optional: additional copy for overhead)

      Copies of 2.9.1 Math Workout

      Fact Power copies

      Math Journals

      Glue sticks

      Slates/ markers

 

 

IV.                 Lesson Outline

 

     Time:  60 Minutes

 

                          5 min. – Understanding the point and the problem-solving task

                          5 min. – Independent problem-solving

                        30 min. – Whole-Class Discussion/Practice/ Summary

     10 min. – Math Workout

     10 min. – Mental Math/ Fact Power

 

 

 

  V.             Learning Activities

 

 

1.   Understanding “the point” and the problem-solving task (5 min.)

 

       Distribute a Problem Solving Task slip to each student.  

 

Students try to read and understand the task independently.  Provide support as needed as students retell the task to partners, the class, or themselves.

 

    

 

       2.  Independent problem-solving (5 min.)

 

            Students work to solve the problem on their slates.    

 

 

 

3.  Whole-Class Discussion/Practice/Summary (30 min.)

 

PART I – Whole-Class Discussion

 

The Big Ideas:

 

ü  10 sets of 10,000 is the same as 100 thousand (100,000).

 

ü  Mathematicians write 10 ten thousands as 100,000

 

ü  Mathematicians call 10 ten thousands “one hundred thousand.”

 

ü  Follows the pattern of our Base-10 Number System:

 

                  10 ones = 10

                  10 tens = 100

                  10 hundreds = 1,000

                  10 thousands = 10,000

                  10 ten-thousands = 100,000

 

ü  Place Value from right to left:  ones, tens, hundreds, thousands, ten-thousands, hundred-thousands.

 

ü  Each time there is 10 of the sets in a place, mathematicians move to the next place value to record a digit.

 

ü  This pattern continues infinitely in our base-10 number system!

Possible Discussion:

 

Students share and discuss their responses to the problem.

 

ü  The most likely mistake that students will probably make is to record a 1 followed by an incorrect number of zeros. 

 

ü  Students may also attempt to write one hundred thousand and misplace the comma.

 

ü  Some students may try to write the ten addends in order to use the standard algorithm to add.  (Since students have not yet learned to multiply.)  Other students will probably count by 10,000s.

 

ü  How many cars are being purchased?  [10]

 

ü  How many dollars does each car cost? [$10,000]  

 

ü  Therefore the question is, “If there are 10 ten-thousands, how much money is that in all?  

 

ü  We can count by ten-thousands: 10,000; 20,000;  30,000; 40,000;  50,000;  60,000;  70,000;  80,000;  90,000, 100,000  

 

ü  Display a place value grid with only 5 spaces: How can we write “one hundred thousand?  

 

ü  We have to insert another place to the left of the ten-thousands place. ___00, 000

 

ü  Each time there is 10 of the sets in a place, mathematicians move to the next place value to record a digit.

 

ü  2 sets of 10,000 = ?  [20,000]; 3 sets of 10,000 = ? [30,000]; 4 sets…etc 10 sets of 10,000 = 100,000.

 

ü  How many do you have to add to 90,000 to have 100,000? [10,000]

 

ü  What number comes just after 99,999?  [100,000]

 

ü  What is the greatest 5-digit number?  [99,999]

 

ü  If we added 1 to 99,999, what would the sum be?  [100,000]

 

ü  What number comes just after 100,000 when we count by ones?  [100,001]

 

PART II – Whole Class Practice

 

 

Distribute a copy of 2.9.1 Place Value Table to each student. 

 

 

You might also display a copy of the table extended to the 100,000s place on the overhead or on a poster.

 

 

Students practice reading, writing, and identifying the place value of digits in six-digit numbers.

 

 

Example Practice Tasks:

 

 

§  Display 6-digit numbers on a flip chart or the place value table and ask students to read the numbers.

 

          *Remind students that we do not say “and” when reading           numbers like 1,001.   (and implies a decimal)

 

 

§  Ask students questions about the number that is pre-printed on the place value table:

 

             What digit is in the ten-thousands place?

 

             What is the value of the digit 6?

 

 

§  Ask students to write a number on their tables. 

 

             Write a 5 in the hundreds place.  Write a 4 in the ten-                            thousands place….etc.

 

            Write five hundred four thousand six hundred forty.                               (more difficult!)

 

 

§  Then ask students questions about that number.

 

             What is the value of the 2?

             What number is 1,000 more?

 

 

 

PART III Summary

 

 

ü  Stop and have students look back at the questions that are The Point of today’s lesson.  Help students form statements to answer the two questions. 

 

ü  Record the statements on the board and students record the statement into their journal as a summary of their learning from the lesson.   

 

                                Example:

 

Mathematicians write 10 ten thousands as 100,000

Mathematicians call 10 ten thousands “one hundred thousand.”

 

 

 

 

4.    Math Workout (10 min.)

 

Students complete 2.9.1 Math Workout.

 

 

 

 

5.    Mental Math/ Fact Power (10 min.)

 

  Students participate in a Mental Math practice session. 

 

Students who did not meet the March 14th goal for Fact Power                          continue to complete Fact Power practice sheets and quizzes.

 

Lesson Resources

2.5.1 Place Value Table.doc  
6,248
2.5.1 Problem Solving Task.doc  
3,051
2.5.1.doc  
1,636
2.5.1.WO (FIXED!).doc  
931
2.5.1.doc  
653
2.5.1 Enlarged.doc  
840

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