Lesson: More Fractions Fundamental

5 Views
0 Downloads
3 Favorites

Lesson Objective

Students will understand what a "denominator" means.

Lesson Plan

 

Do Now

Give each student an index card for the Do Now

  • Tell students to fold their index cards into equal parts.

Opening

  • Discuss the Do Now by asking how many equal parts did you fold your paper into
  • State today's objective.

Direct Instruction

  • Get several sheets of colored construction paper and do the following demonstration for your students.
  • Take one color and leave it whole.
  • Tape it to the chalkboard and write the number 1 on it.
  • Take the next color, carefully fold it in two pieces and cut them apart. Ask the students how many pieces you now have. Allow for student to respond 2.
  • Hold up one of them and explain that there are actually two pieces, but you are holding up only 1 piece.
  • Write1/2 on one piece of paper and tape it to the chalkboard.
  • Now get a third sheet of paper and fold and cut it into four pieces.
  • Ask the students how many pieces you now have. Allow student to respond 4
  • Hold up one of them and explain that there are actually four pieces, but you are holding up only 1 piece.
  • Write 1/4 on the paper and tape it to the chalkboard.
  • Continue to do this, making 8 pieces and then 16. When one each of all of the papers is on the chalkboard, ask students if they can see a pattern.

Guided Practice

  • Question students to help them see that each time there is only one piece--hence the number on the top of the fraction is the same each time--and that the pieces get smaller as the number gets bigger.
  • Introduce the term numerator and denominator by telling students the following: that the number on the bottom--denominator--tells how many pieces there are and that the more pieces you cut something into, the smaller each piece will become.

Independent Practice

  • Distribute and explain Independent Practice sheet.
  • Allow time for students to complete the practice sheet. 

 

  • Closing

Tell students to fold into 10th. Then 20th. Which was smallest? Tenths or 20th?

  • Record your answer to the independent practice into Math Journals.

Lesson Resources

IP More Fundametals of Fractions  

Close

 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close