Lesson: Lesson 3: Rights and Dictators

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Lesson Objective

By the end of the lesson, SWBAT explain how America is different from other countries in the world that do not guarantee the rights of their citizens. By the end of the lesson, SWBAT to compare and contrast the human rights in America with those found in dictatorships.

Lesson Plan

Key Points: 

·       The Bill of Rights protects Americans from situations that can be found in oppressive dictatorships around the world.

·       The Bill of Rights cannot be violated by the Government of the United States.


Vocabulary: Rights, Dictatorship, North Korea, Oppression, Constitution


Essential Question: What can happen in a country that does not give its citizens their rights?


Assessment: During the independent practice, students will independently draw two different worlds. One world will be a community that has human rights, specifically the Bill of Rights, while the other does not. In addition, during the Introduction to New Material, and Guided Practice, Ss will have to identify which Bill of Right was violated in a given scenario or society. Finally, during independent practice, the Ss will also be completing a writing prompt that asks them to analyze the differences between a society that has rights and one that does not.


Opening (10 minutes):

Teacher:

·       Teacher will put the following starter on the board: “What would America look like without the Bill of Rights?”

·       Teacher will ask the students from various groups to relay their answers to the class.

·       The teacher will explain the objectives and purpose of the day’s lesson: “By the end of the lesson, SWBAT explain how America is different from other countries in the world that do not guarantee the rights of their students.”

Students:

·       Students will sit down at their appropriate seats

·       Students will work through the sponge

·       Students will share their responses with the class – if they want.


Introduction of New Material (30 minutes):

Teacher:

·       T will begin the lesson by asking if any of the Ss can remember two of the Bill of Rights.

·       T will write down their responses.

·       T will then quickly reiterate that the Bill of Rights was created to protect the people of America from its government.

·       The Bill of Rights prevented the government from becoming all powerful and taking away people’s human rights.

·       T will have the Ss close their eyes and imagine a world that did not guarantee the rights of its citizens.

·       T will have the students brainstorm what that world would look like

·       T will write down the responses on the board.

·       T will then show a brief PowerPoint about North Korea.

·       While T is showing the PowerPoint, the Bill of Rights will have been written on a piece of Chart Paper.

·       T can also have the students turn to their Bill of Rights Flipbook that they created in the previous lesson for a reference.

·       As T goes through the PowerPoint – T will ask the Ss “if this were in America, what Bill of Rights would be violated?”

·       T will wait for the responses from the Ss – then flip to the next slide where it will explain what Bill of Rights was violated.

·       T will explain that it is important to see that countries do exist in the world that do not have the same human rights as the United States.

·       T will explain that a country and an all-powerful government is what a lot of people were afraid of with the creation of the Constitution.

·       T will explain that that reason is why the Bill of Rights exists.

·       T will have the students jot down what rights they think are missing in North Korea. T will tell them at the end of the PowerPoint, there will be a discussion on the subject.

Students:

·       Students will pay attention to the PowerPoint

·       Students will answer the questions that are presented on the PowerPoint.

·       Students will work through which rights declared in the Bill of Rights are missing in North Korea.


Guided Practice (15 minutes):

Teacher:

·       T will then pull out 3 scenarios: each a situation where one of the Bill of Rights was violated. 

·       The first scenario will have to do with Free Speech being shut down, the second will have to with unlawful seizure of property, and the third one will be on the lack of trial by jury. 

·       In each scenario, T will ask the Ss why this situation was unlawful. 

·       T will wait for the Ss to respond with a certain Amendment from the Bill of Rights. In addition, T will ask the Ss to explain why that particular Bill was violated. 

·       T can have the Ss work in groups, cooperatively coming up with the answers, or the answers can be said individually as well.  

Students:

·       Students will listen to the scenarios very carefully and either work with their groups or individually to figure out what Amendment was broken.

·       Students will be respectful (not shouting out answers) during this exercise.


Independent Practice (30 minutes):

Teacher:

·       T will then tell the Ss now that they have witnessed and heard about countries that have human rights, and countries that do not, T would like them to draw illustrations of the two worlds.

·       T will ask that on one side of the paper a  Ss will draw or write about a world with no rights, while on the other half T will ask the Ss to draw or write about a world that has rights.

·       T will tell the Ss to use their imaginations and think about what the Bill of Rights allows people to do, and what a place that did not have those rights would look like, sound like, and feels like.

·       T will monitor the Ss as they do this drawing exercise.

·       T will also pull those students that showed they did not master the material on the previous day’s exit ticket aside for small group tutoring.

·       When students complete the Bill of Rights dichotomy, they will then complete the following writing prompt: “After looking at North Korea and seeing some of the rights that people there do not have in their lives, what do you think is the most important right that Americans have coming from the Bill of Rights?

Students: 

·       Ss will do their group quilt project respectfully, quietly, and diligently

·       Ss will ask questions if they have problems.

·       Ss will complete the writing prompt.


Closing (10 minutes):

Teacher:

·       As a closing, T will point to Ss to read the Bill of Rights as a class.

·       T will then go over the Bill of Rights project that they will have to complete.

·       T will close out the lesson by reviewing the objectives and leading the Ss to think about the next lesson in which the class will discuss the responsibilities of citizens.

Student:

·       Students will reiterate the Bill of Rights.

·       Students will learn about the Bill of Rights Project.

·       Students will listen to the closure and ask final questions about next lesson.


Homework: Bill of Rights Project


Materials:  Graphic Organizer, Scenarios, Writing Prompt, Dichotomy Activity, LCD


Teacher’s Reflection:

This is one lesson that my students remembered until the end of the year because of the amazing facts that I found and shared about North Korea. They couldn’t believe that people lived in the type of conditions that was considered normal for numerous North Koreans. They also couldn’t believe that while there were many people suffering that Kim Jung Ill was still able to enjoy lots of luxuries. I think the more facts I shared about North Korea and the oppressive nature of their governmental regime really helped the students understand the importance of the Bill of Rights, and what a right actually is in their world. 

 

Lesson Resources

American Civics Unit - Lesson 3 - Rights and Dictators - Rights Dichotomy Activity   Activity
7
American Civics Unit - Lesson 3 - Rights and Dictators - Rights Dichotomy Activity (Mac)   Activity
1
American Civics Unit - Lesson 3 - Rights and Dictators - Graphic Organizer Scenarios Writing Prompt   Writing Assignment
2
American Civics Unit - Lesson 3 - Rights and Dictators - Lesson Plan   Lesson Plan
4
American Civics Unit - Bill of Rights Project - Venn Diagram   Project
American Civics Unit - Bill of Rights Project - Rubric   Project
American Civics Unit - Bill of Rights Project    Project
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American Civics Unit- Bill of Rights Project (Mac)   Project
American Civics Unit - Lesson 3 - Rights and Dictators - Key Note (Mac)   Smart Board
American Civics Unit - Lesson 3 - Rights and Dictators - PowerPoint   Smart Board
Fast Facts on North Korea
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North Korea Country Profile (BBC)
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North Korea Facts (CIA)
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