Lesson: Lesson 2: Bill of Rights

309 Views
0 Downloads
8 Favorites

Lesson Objective

By the end of the lesson, SWBAT explain why the Bill of Rights was created. At the end of the lesson, SWBAT explain that the Bill of Rights are the first 10 Amendments of the Constitution. By the end of the lesson, SWBAT explain how the Bill of Rights protects the rights of Americans.

Lesson Plan

Key Points:

·       Many were scared of a powerful Federal government, so there was a group of people who wanted to make sure that the rights of the people were written down and guaranteed.

·       The first 10 Amendments of the Constitution are The Bill of Rights.

·       The Bill of Rights protects and guarantees your rights as a citizen of the United States.


Essential Questions: Why is it important to have rights?


Vocabulary: Bill of Rights, Constitution, Preamble, E Pluribus Unum, Framers, Right


Assessment: During the independent practice, Ss will complete a “Pocket Bill of Rights Flip Book” The pocket Bill of Rights must contain images that pertain to each of the 10 Amendments. In addition, a written exit ticket will be given to each student with the questions: “What are human rights?” “Why was the Bill of Rights created?” “List two Bill of Rights in your own words.”


Opening (5 minutes):

Teacher:

·       Teacher will put the following starter on the board: “What are some of the rights that people in China did not have?”

·       Teacher will ask the students from various groups to relay their answers to the class.

·       The teacher will explain the objectives and purpose of the day’s lesson: By the end of the lesson, SWBAT explain why the Bill of Rights was created.

·       At the end of the lesson, SWBAT to explain that the Bill of Rights are the first 10 Amendments of the Constitution.

·       By the end of the lesson, SWBAT to explain how the Bill of Rights protects the rights of Americans.

Students:

·       Students will sit down at their appropriate seats

·       Students will work through the starter.

·       Students will share their responses with the class – if they want.

·       Students will ask questions about the day’s objectives if they have any.


Introduction of New Material (25 minutes):

Teacher:

·       T will hand out a graphic organizer that has a chart for each of the 10 Bill of Rights.

·       T will explain that it is the job of the student to fill out the graphic organizer while the T is presenting the information

·       T will ask the Ss if they recall our discussion on China from the previous week

·       T will ask the Ss if they can remember what China did not have – T will wait for the reply – Human Rights.

·       T will ask the Ss to list some of the human rights they remember – being able to say what you want, practice whatever religion you want, vote for a person that you want.

·       T will tell the Ss that when the Framers were designing the Constitution, many people were afraid that because the government was getting bigger and stronger, that they would take away the freedom and human rights that many people fought Great Britain to obtain.

·       T will explain that because of this fear, many people wanted the rights of the people written down in the Constitution to prevent any person or government from overstepping their bounds and taking away people’s rights.

·       Therefore, the first ten Amendments became the Bill of Rights.

·       T will flip to the first slide in the PowerPoint which goes over each Bill of Rights

·       T will let the students write down the definition of the Bill of Rights: “The first 10 Amendments in the Constitution that work to protect the rights of every American citizen.”

·       T will explain that the Bill of Rights is one of the most important things you will learn all year long.

·       T will explain that knowing your rights as Americans will make you safer, smarter, and help you to understand all of the things that you should be allowed to do without hassle from the government.

·       T will go through each of the Amendments – stopping at each slide to give examples and allow the students to write the information in their graphic organizer.

Students:

·       Students will take notes on a graphic organizer

·       Students will ask questions and answer questions when needed.

·       Students will begin to think about human rights as something they possess.


Guided Practice (15 minutes):

Teacher:

·       T will hand out the lyrics to the Bill of Rights rap.

·       T will review the lyrics with the students.

·       T will then play the Bill of Rights rap.

·       T will have a discussion with the class about the images they saw and the words that were rapped.

·       T will then tell the Ss that because the Bill of Rights are so important, they are going to complete their own Pocket Bill of Rights.

·       T will explain to the class that they are going to write down the Amendment, and draw a picture that corresponds to that right.

·       T will model what to do by using the First Amendment as an example: T will write down the information from the graphic organizer and then think about what Freedom of Speech looks like – like a protestor, or someone speaking up against government.

·       T will ask the Ss if they have any questions.

Students:

·       Students will pay attention to the directions of the project.

·       Students will ask questions.

·       Students will follow the model.


Independent Practice (35 minutes):

Teacher:

·       T will hand out the pocket Bill of Rights template.

·       T will ask the Ss if they have any final questions.

·       T will monitor the Ss as they complete the project.

·       T will pull aside those that showed confusion on this assignment or the previous assignment with the Preamble and assist them on the project.

·       T will have early finishers read the section in the book on the bill of rights and how it affects their lives

·       T will work with the students that are not understanding the concepts by having them work in pairs and discussing the meanings of each amendment.

Students:

·       Ss will do their project respectfully, quietly, and diligently


Closing (10 minutes):

Teacher:

·       As a closing, T will give out a brief exit ticket with the following questions: “What are human rights?” “Why was the Bill of Rights created?” “List two Bill of Rights in your own words.”

·       T will monitor the Ss as they finish their exit tickets.

·       T will close out the lesson by reviewing the objectives and leading the Ss to think about the next lesson in which will talk about a world where human rights do not exist and are squashed. 

·       T will explain that the students should complete their Bill of Rights Flip Book if they have not finished.

Student:

·       Students will complete the exit ticket independently.

·       Students will listen to the closure and ask final questions about next lesson.


Homework: Finish the Bill of Rights Flip Book


Materials:  Bill of Rights Flip Book, LCD, Graphic Organizer, Art Supplies


Teacher’s Reflection:

There are a couple key lessons that I learned from doing this lesson:

1) For my students, each amendment needed to be broken down into very simple language that they could relate to in their own lives. That is why I found that personal stories or made up stories using students’ names in those scenarios really made the class connect more with the content.

2) The reason I put a discussion at the start of the lesson on China is so that the students start to really conceptualize what a right is, and what it means to individuals.

3) I found that really encouraging students to take their time on the Bill of Rights Flip Book really made a difference because a lot of students kept them in their binders until the end of the year. It’s a great resource to continue to go back to when discussing encroachment of rights (ie: Civil Rights Movement, etc.)

4) The Bill of Rights rap, while cheesy, really helped my students learn the meaning of the Amendments. Warning: they will sing the rap all day everyday. 

 

Lesson Resources

American Civics Unit - Lesson 2 - Bill of Rights - Bill of Rights Rap Lyrics   Other
7
Bill of Rights Rap   Other
32
American Civics Unit - Lesson 2 - Bill of Rights - Bill of Rights Flip Book   Activity
17
American Civics Unit - Lesson 2 - Bill of Rights - Bill of Rights Flip Book (Mac)  
5
American Civics Unit - Lesson 2 - Bill of Rights - PowerPoint   Smart Board
17
American Civics Unit - Lesson 2 - Bill of Rights - Lesson Plan   Lesson Plan
8
American Civics Unit - Lesson 2 - Bill of Rights - Key Note (Mac)   Smart Board
3
American Civics Unit - Lesson 2 - Bill of Rights - Graphic Organizer  
11
American Civics Unit - Lesson 2 - Bill of Rights - Exit Ticket   Assessment
8

Close

 
Something went wrong. See details for more info
Nothing to upload
details
close