Lesson: 1: Supporting Author’s Voice

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Lesson Objective

Students will be able to give examples of words and phrases that support the author’s voice in a poem.

Lesson Plan

(I)               will explain that when you read, you can “hear” an author’s voice. By looking at the words the author chooses and how he/she describes the setting, characters, or plot, you can identify the voice of the author. Voice is the author’s tone or attitude toward a subject of a text. I will read the poem “Enter This Deserted House” by Shel Silverstein in Where the Sidewalk Ends (page 56) aloud. I will model identifying the author’s voice in the poem. The author describes the setting with, “frogs dwell here”, “gnomes dwell here and goblins too”, and finally “I dwell here…. And so do you”. The author is trying to make the poem spooky and give the reader an eerie feeling. By looking at how the author describes the setting and words the author chooses to use, I can identify the author’s voice as “spooky”
 
(We)           will read the poem “What a Day” (p.118) by Shel Silverstein in Where the Sidewalk Ends and identify the author’s voice in the poem. For example, I can identify the author’s voice as frustrated/overwhelmed by all these events. The author sounds like he doesn’t know what to do about all of these things because he just keeps repeating, “Oh what a day..
 
(You)          will read another poem by Shel Silverstein, “Don’t Tell Me” (p.177), and identify the words and phrases that support the author’s voice. The author’s voice in the poem you read is “annoyed”. You will identify the words and phrases that support the author’s voice. (Independent Practice is provided.)
 
Note: You will need to provide a copy of the poem to students to complete the Independent Practice.


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Lesson Resources

Student Independent Practice Worksheet   Classwork
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