Lesson: Opinions

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Lesson Objective

Non-fiction readers identify opinions in their reading by looking for points of view or judgments SWBAT decipher fact vs. opinion and find 2 examples of an opinion in their ‘just-right’ text.

Lesson Plan

 

TP:

Non-fiction readers identify opinions in their reading by looking for points of view or judgments

SWBAT decipher fact vs. opinion and find 2 examples of an opinion in their 'just-right' text.

 

Connect:

Readers, we've been learning about non-fiction texts and how we can learn us much information as possible from all the headings, pictures, charts, diagrams, and text inside.  Yesterday we learned how to tell if the information we're reading is a fact by asking "Can we prove this is true?"

 

Teach:

Today I want to teach you that Non-Fiction readers identify opinions in their reading by looking for points of view or judgments. An opinion is how someone feels about a place or thing.

 

This is important because as non-fiction readers we need to be able to tell when someone is telling us something which is true, and when someone is just telling us something that THEY think, feel or believe is true.

 

Key words we might want to look for are: think, believe, comparison words (best, prettiest, most), should have, would have

 

Steps:

1.    Read and stop at new information. 

2.    Ask, "Is someone trying to get me to think, feel or believe something? 

3.    If yes....it's an opinion!!

 

Watch me as I read the text 'Hooray for Hummingbirds.' When I learn new information, I'll stop and ask myself "Is someone trying to get me to think, feel or believe something?"

 

(Stop)"Some people say hummingbirds look like pieces of the rainbow."

Is this a fact or opinion? It's not a fact because I can't prove it's true. It's an opinion because it is what some people think or feel.

 

Active Engagement:

Now you try! Let's continue on and stop when we learn something new.

(Stop) "Bugs make a nice snack." Is this a fact or an opinion? Does everyone think this?

 

Link:

Today and everyday when you are reading non-fiction texts, remember to look for opinions or points of view by looking for key words such as think, believe, comparison words (best, prettiest, most), should have, would have.

 

Independent Work:

Reading A-Z Texts based on Fountas and Pinnell Reading Levels:

Level D: Where Plants Grow

Level G: Goats are Great

Level M: Art Around Us

 

SWBAT identify 2 points of view/opinions in their just-right books with a post-it.

Share:

One opinion I found in my 'just-right' text today was...

 

 

What went well? Having the background of how to determine if something was a fact was useful for them. If something couldn't be proven or wasn't true, they knew it was an opinion.

 

What would you change? I don't know if having key words to look for helped them in this case. Looking for superlatives or think, believe doesn't work because it's not the language naturally used in a lot of opinions. Also, I tried an actual 4th grade test passage for the example. I don't think it was as engaging as another text choice, but it did give them practice in the level of text they will be tested on.

 

What needs explaining: Their independent work was in a 'Just-right' text from Reading A-Z. I searched on the site to make sure the text selected had facts and opinions. 

Lesson Resources

Opinion Chart   Other
553
Reading A-Z
1137
Opinions Lesson   Lesson Plan
727
Hooray for Hummingbirds Text   Reading Passage
451

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