Lesson: Facts

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Lesson Objective

Non-Fiction Readers distinguish between fact and opinion by asking “Can I prove that this is true?” SWBAT decipher two facts in their ‘just-right’ book by post-it-ing places in their book and explaining it to their partner. SWBAT decipher between fact vs. opinion (not-true)

Lesson Plan

 

TP:

Non-Fiction Readers distinguish between fact and opinion by asking "Can I prove that this is true?"

 

SWBAT decipher two facts in their 'just-right' book by post-it-ing places in their book and explaining it to their partner.

SWBAT decipher between fact vs. opinion (not-true)

 

Connect:

Readers, we've been learning about the different text features in non-fiction books. We can find information quickly, and we are plowing through our non-fiction books. When we read non-fiction, it is easy to assume that everything we read is true. BUT IT'S NOT! Sometimes, writers want us to believe or think a certain thing. 

 

Teach:

Today I want to teach you that readers determine whether something is a fact by asking "Can I prove that this is true?" 

 

This is important because, as non-fiction readers we need to be able to tell when someone is telling us something which is true, and when someone is just telling us something that THEY think or believe is true. We wouldn't want to go around telling people our cool facts if they weren't true.

 

Facts Clues are:

Percentages, dates, and statistics (specific numbers)

Watch me as I begin to read the text 'Grasshoppers' and stop when I get to new information. I'm going to ask, "Can I prove that this is true?" If so, It's a fact.

 

Active Engagement:

Now it's your turn! Listen closely as I read the next paragraph of 'Grasshoppers.' When I stop, I want you to put your thumbs up if what I just said/read is true (we can prove it!) and a thumbs down if it is someone else's belief (can't prove).

 

Additional Practice with Facts (Thumbs up or down)

_____ is the best game ever!

There are 50 states.

George Washington was our first president.

Cheese is a great lunch.

 

Link:

Today and everyday when you're reading non-fiction books remember to stop and ask yourself, "Can I prove that this is true?" to tell whether something is a fact or an opinion.

 

Today you will read a 'just-right' book and put a post-it by 2 facts you find.

 

Reading A-Z Texts based on Fountas and Pinnell Levels:

Level D: Where Plants Grow

Level H: Goats are Great

Level L: Art Around Us

Share:

One fact I found in my 'just-right' book today was....

 

 

What went well? Choosing an independent text for each group of kids ahead of time from Readinga-z.com worked great. The kids were excited about having a new text, and I checked online to make sure their were facts AND opinions in each text so the text can be used for the next day's independent work as well.

 

 

What would you change? The choice of text for the active engagement was a bit too high for my kids. I gave each of them a copy of the text, but it was still difficult for them to keep up and connect it to the lesson.

 

 

What needs explaining? My school assesses independent reading levels based on the Fountas and Pinnell Reading Assessment. If your school uses a different system, the level might not quite match up. Also, if you use Readinga-z.com, the level they use are sometimes different from F&P but are translated online. 

Lesson Resources

Facts Chart   Other
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Natural Defenses
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Facts Lesson   Lesson Plan
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Reading A-Z
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